Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 24 Hours Last 24 Hours Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Forums Clear All
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 01:04 AM
    This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of*Iraq Business News. By Saleem al-Wazzan. As Saudis Prepare To Open Basra Consulate, Iran Opens Border To Iraqis Iraqis can now visit a special visa-free zone in neighbouring Iran, over the border from Basra. Some locals see the open border as a cynical economic and political move that helps Iran, but not Iraq. An Iraqi passport is one of the most difficult in the world. Only a handful of countries will allow Iraqis to travel there without applying for a visa a long time in advance. But now, Iraq’s next-door neighbour, Iran, has opened some of the areas closest to Basra to Iraqis, that they may access without a visa. The decision has been greeted with both enthusiasm and cynicism in Iraq. Locals in southern Iraq have often made pilgrimages into Iran for religious and medical reasons and they welcome the decision, even though it only applies to the areas of Khorramshahr*and Abadan, which lie directly on the border. Meanwhile local businessmen say it’s a commercial decision that will mainly benefit Iran. The decision has been made and now Iran is only waiting for the Iraqi government’s go-ahead, Ahmed*Sayhaboush, head of mission at the Iranian consulate in Basra, said. He explained that the decision was made in the interests of encouraging friendly relations between the two countries. Passports will still be stamped at the border, the head of communications at the Iranian consulate, Mohammed Ismail, explained. Iraqis will be able to stay in the visa-free border areas for up to a month and during that time, they can obtain a visa to travel further into Iran if they wish. There will be special crossing points in Khorramshahr*and Abadan. Many Iraqis on religious pilgrimage like to go to the shrine of Imam*Reza*in the city of*Mashhad, for example, but this is well out of the visa-free area. The border authorities have decided to limit the entry times of Iraqis wishing to cross into the visa-free zones to between 6am and 5pm daily, Ali Yousef, a spokesperson for the Basra council, explained further. “The Iranian move will increase the number of people moving between the two countries and this will benefit both nations” Jabbar al-Saedi, the head of the security committee on Basra’s provincial council, said. “We have however stressed the need to follow up on security controls to prevent any illegals crossing the border.” One local from Basra, Mohammed Marhoun, believes that the visa-free zones will be good for business. He says he has already purchased a house and an apartment in Khorramshahr*and says the process was relatively uncomplicated, compared to the bureaucracy he faced in Iraq. The number of visitors from Iraq into Iran means that there is more construction in border areas to accommodate visitors. The only problem, Marhoun said, was that one did have to have an Iranian name on the deed. And he is not the only one utilising this opportunity, Marhoun points out. “Members of the provincial council and MPs from Basra have also invested in real estate in the visa-free zones,” he noted. “But they don’t want anybody to know about these investments, which are now being managed by Iranians.” While businesspeople like Marhoun and investors in real estate might be pleased, there are some observers who are not so enthusiastic. They believe that the move will only benefit Iran in the long run. It’s just another way to deplete Iraq’s currency reserves and to encourage more consumerism among Iraqis, says Nabil Jaafar Abdul Redha, a professor of economics in Basra. “Even if Iraq now allows Iranians to enter Iraqi cities without a visa nothing will change because there are no local products to be sold to them,” Abdul Redha argues. “So, the Iraqi economy is the loser in this process.” “Iraqis might benefit from being able to go to Khorramshahr*or Abadan and buying Iranian goods at slightly lower prices,” he concedes. “But overall, this does not benefit Iraq.” The main problem is that Iraq doesn’t produce much other than oil – it remains what is known as a rentier economy, one that is basically dependent on exporting oil to fuel its economy. Most manufactured goods are imported, in exchange for the money the oil raises. “Our economy is not as diversified as Iran’s,” Abdul Redha tells NIQASH. “So, any commercial exchange with our neighbours – that includes Iran, Turkey or Saudi Arabia – tends to be one sided.” There has been an influx of Iranians into Iraq in recent years for religious reasons. But that doesn’t outweigh the trade balance, he adds. “The number of Iraqis entering Iran every day numbers between 2,000 and 3,000,” posits Abdel-Saheb Saleh, deputy head of an association for Basra’s businesses. “If we estimate that each of them will spend between US$100 and US$500 over there, that’s a good income for Iran.” Saleh thinks the visa-free areas could be a positive for another reason. Iraq has been isolated for a long time due to security and political issues, Saleh says. This could be seen as a positive message to other regional governments who block the entry of Iraqis. “For example, a visa to visit Kuwait costs US$1,800 on the black market,” he complains. Meanwhile local man, Ahmad Fadel, a civil society activist who recently visited what will be the visa-free zone, isn’t that impressed. For one thing, he says, the Iranian border guards treat the Iraqis crossing into their country badly. For another, there’s not much in Khorramshahr*or Abadan that could really attract tourists. “The cities have poor infrastructure,” he notes. And Fadel has another theory as to the reason behind the visa-free zones. He believes it may also be the Iranian reaction to Iraq’s new détente with Saudi Arabia, a country the Iranians tend to see as a geo-political rival. Saudi Arabia is about to reopen its consulate in new premises in Basra; it closed the original one way back in 1990. Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 11 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 01:04 AM
    700 families in West Mosul receive housing units from UNHCR with funds from the people of Japan Some 700 families in Mosul whose homes were destroyed in the recent conflict now have a new place to live. Temporary housing units were set up in 26 neighbourhoods in the west of the city, which saw extensive destruction in the battle to retake the city from extremist control. During the battle for Mosul, almost 1 million Iraqis fled the fighting, seeking safety in nearby camps and host communities. After the fighting ended people began to return to the city, but for many citizens of Mosul, their homes were too badly damaged for them to return. “So many displaced Iraqis want to go home and restart their lives,” said Bruno Geddo, UNHCR Representative in Iraq. “Rebuilding Mosul is an immense task that will take years. The housing units will provide shelter for up to three years to Iraqis returning to their communities. This will give them breathing space to make longer term plans.” The people of Japan generously donated US$ 4.5 million to camp management services, cash assistance and temporary housing programmes to support displaced people and returnees in Mosul cope with the harsh winter conditions. Approximately 18,000 people benefited from the cash assistance, while 4,200 people are housed in the new housing units. The units were formally handed over to their new occupants by Mr Geddo at a ceremony in Mosul on 21 February. H.E. Mr. Fumio Iwai, Ambassador of Japan to Iraq said, “We remain concerned about the unstable humanitarian situation in West Mosul even after its liberation from the battle, where many of the houses were completely destroyed or heavily damaged.” He added, “Japan strongly hopes the provision of housing units and cash assistance through this emergency grant assistance help the displaced and returnees secure their shelters and the basic needs as a response to the transitional phase for further stabilization and reconstruction of the city.” “Thanks to the generosity of the Japanese people, 700 families now have a housing solution that keeps out the winter cold,” said Mr Geddo. “Although the emergency is now over, we have a responsibility to continue to support the people of Iraq. Sustainable return is a cornerstone of the transition towards a better future. We must not let them down at this critical juncture.” (Source: UN) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 11 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 01:04 AM
    From UN Environment. How dangerously dirty water is threatening one of the world’s ancient religions On an unseasonably warm winter afternoon in Baghdad, Sheikh Anmar Ayid hitches up his robe and crouches by the Tigris river. Rocking back and forth on his haunches, he flicks the water from side to side – all the while chanting rhythmically in Aramaic. After finishing his ablutions, a two-minute procedure, the young sheikh turns to a small mud-brick temple and begins to pray. In past years, Ayid might then have quenched his thirst directly from the river. As a Mandaean priest, an adherent of a pre-Abrahamic faith that’s native to the Fertile Crescent, he and his co-religionists believe the Tigris – and the Euphrates – are sacred and flow from heaven. Clerics are consequently only supposed to drink from and eat food washed in their waters. That, however, is scarcely even possible these days. Dirtied and drained almost from the moment they rise, Iraq’s great waterways are in bleak states by the time they reach the country’s heavily urbanized centre. To drink straight from them is to invite near instant sickness. And so*as the rivers plumb desperate new lows, seemingly worsening by the year, the Mandaeans are struggling to practice their several thousand-year-old rituals. “We depend on the water for everything, for worship, for daily life, for food,” Ayid said. “But because the water is going from bad to very bad, we are negatively affected.” Across the world, water pollution is leaving a devastating trail in its wake. Eighty per cent of all wastewater goes untreated, and much of finds its way back into rivers and lakes – where it contributes to ecosystem and public health crises. Up to a third of all rivers are blighted with pathogenic waste, according to UN Environment data, and a seventh suffer from organic waste problems, mostly from agricultural fertilizer run off. In largely desert countries, like Iraq, worsening sandstorms and diminishing grass cover have caked the rivers with dust and saddled water treatment facilities with a new range of woes. Never before, though, it seems, has poor water quality imperiled an entire religion. Already threatened by jihadists and criminal gangs, who damn them as heretics and target them for their historic role in the gold trade, the Mandaeans’ numbers have fallen from 100,000 to less than 10,000 in Iraq since 2003. For those who remain, pollution’s assault on one of the central tenets of their faith has added final insult to injury. In Amarah, 350 km south of Baghdad on the Tigris, the pollution is so debilitating that not even boiling water is enough to prevent local priests from falling ill. At their heavily-guarded riverside temple in the Iraqi capital, Ayid and his colleagues have taken to leaving buckets of water to sit for a day, before skimming off the layer of fetid scum that’s usually accumulated on the top. From Baghdad to the Mandaeans’ traditional heartlands in the country’s far south, there’s so much glass and trash in the shallows that few worshippers dare set foot in the rivers without wearing sandals.“Our religion believes human nature requires hygiene, and so for us many things are built around water,” Ayid said. “But where is the hygiene here?” What makes this all the more frustrating for many Mandaeans is that the culprits are hiding in plain sight. With insufficient wastewater treatment facilities and lax environmental regulations, ever-growing volumes of industrial and domestic refuse are seeping into the rivers. In Baghdad alone, dozens of places, including the Dora oil refinery and the massive Medical City hospital complex, discharge waste directly into the Tigris, according to local conservationists. All this at the same time as upstream dam construction and reduced rainfall cut the rivers’ flow has brought the lifeblood of the Mandaeans faith to the brink of disaster. “When water levels drop, the health of that lake or river is likely to be affected, both in terms of quantity and quality,” says Lis Mullin Bernhardt, a Programme Officer in UN Environment’s Freshwater Unit. “And the lower the flow, the less likely that water body is to be able to deal naturally with water pollution and contamination.” Globally, there is an increasing awareness that something drastic has to be done. UN Environment operates a monitoring system, GEMS/Water, which keeps tabs on river and lake water quality, and also helps states establish their own water quality surveillance networks. “For me, it’s like going to the doctor,” Bernhardt says. “You need that monitoring, those stats and numbers, to understand what’s happening and know a bit more about what you can do about it.” By encouraging the planting of water grasses and the preservation of wetlands, for example, UN Environment is pushing for green solutions to water quality problems. But for the Mandaeans, the fear is that no manner of solutions might arrive fast enough to save their rituals – and perhaps their very existence. Scattered now across Europe, North America and Australia, they question whether a community as small as theirs can endure in diaspora. That a people whose faith teaches care for the environment might die in part because of it is a tragic irony not lost on Sheikh Ayid. “Above all, we respect the water, of course. But we respect the Earth and the animals too. It is forbidden, for example, to play with a living tree, to slaughter an animal unless it is needed, or to throw things into the river,” he said. “Our daily life depends on nature, but nature is not being kind to us.” Learn more about UN Environment’s work on freshwater ecosystems.* (Source: UN Environment) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 12 view(s)
  • Mo Dinar's Avatar
    Today, 12:03 AM
    Hotmail, the only generic service I have never had an email account with lol!
    9 replies | 563 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:39 PM
    Source: Read the story here Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 26 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:01 AM
    The United States congratulates the Government of Iraq and the Iraqi Air Force on the reopening of its Air Force Air Academy, which took place at Balad Air Force Base today. The United States and the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS will support the new Academy by providing mentoring to the Academy’s first class of cadets on topics ranging from aviation safety and flight discipline to officer professional development and familiarity with aircraft technical orders. Following Iraqi Prime Minister Haider Al Abadi’s announcement in December 2017 on the full liberation of Iraqi territory from ISIS, the Iraqi government took steps to reopen the Academy’s ahead of schedule, establishing an expeditionary training site at Balad Air Force Base until a final main campus is established. “In coordination with the Iraqi government, the Coalition will help establish standardized upgrade training programs with deliberate development of aviation airmen and maintenance technicians,” said Brig Gen. Andrew Croft, Director of the Coalition Aviation Advisory and Training Team. “Air advisors with the Coalition will also work with these cadets and future students to provide conversational English practice as part of their training.” The Iraqi Air Force Air Academy will focus on developing maintenance officers as well as fighter, reconnaissance, and mobility pilots. Iraqi aviators will train on the Cessna 172, Cessna 208, T-6, and T-50 aircraft. The first 40 cadets will begin their coursework in March. Upon graduation from the Academy, pilots will focus on specialized training at various locations in Iraq. Through this support to the Government of Iraq, the United States and the Coalition are helping to build a sustainable aviation institution for Iraq’s future security and defense needs. The Academy is another step in Iraq rebuilding its military institutions, and will give them a structure that will continue the professionalization of their Air Force. (Source: US Embassy in Baghdad) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 30 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:01 AM
    By Adnan Abu Zeed for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.* Will Great Mosque of Samarra and its minaret survive? The Malwiya Minaret, an impressive tower at a height of 52 meters (171*feet) with a spiral ramp, still recalls the past glory of the Great Mosque of Samarra, which had been the largest mosque in the world during the Abbasid Caliphate. However, the spiraling structure of more than*a thousand years now runs the risk of crumbling because of the many*attacks it*has suffered, according to Iraqi media reports. Its external stairway is unstable, with some stones missing, and the minaret has shaky walls that have the names of visitors carved into them. There is no security at the site, and a*young man fell from the minaret and died on March 29, 2017, after having attempted to climb it. Malwiya is known for its spiraling structure; it*does not look like any other minaret in the world. It is one of the many historical landmarks of Samarra, which was*put*on*UNESCO’s World Heritage List*in 2007. Located on both sides of the Tigris River, 130 kilometers (81 miles)*north of Baghdad, the ancient capital of Samarra shows the reach*of the Abbasid Caliphate, which*was the major Islamic empire of the 8th century; it extended*from Tunisia to Central Asia. Today, Samarra is the only surviving Islamic capital that retains its original plan, architecture and arts*such as mosaics and carvings. The Al Ahram Gate*website reported that a study (“Suggested techniques to preserve Samarra Mosque with its Malwiya Minaret”) conducted last year by Issam Hishmat of*South Valley University in Egypt said*the mosque has suffered*damage of various sorts over the years. In 2003, during the American invasion of Iraq, the mosque served as a military base, and in 2005, the minaret was damaged during*a terrorist attack, destroying many of the architectural elements of the*1,200-year-old monument. Mahmoud Khalaf, the mayor of the Samarra district, said some of the damage to the mosque is caused by weather conditions and humidity. Khalaf told Al-Monitor that maintenance work*on the site of the*mosque is well underway. In 2017, UNESCO and the Iraqi authorities signed an agreement for the conservation and management of the*archaeological city of Samarra, starting with the restoration of the Great Mosque and the Malwiya*Minaret. “I have tried to communicate with officials from both the local and federal governments to obtain*more funds for the rehabilitation of*this old monument, but we get the same answer every time: ‘The top priority is the war against the Islamic State, the country’s security and stability,’” Khalaf said, explaining that a UNESCO delegation has been studying the site to find a solution*to the damage caused by humidity and the deterioration of the bricks. Khalaf has been in touch with engineer and archaeologist Giovanni Fontana Antonelli, a member of the UNESCO delegation who works on the restoration of the site. “We are trying to assess the condition of the mosque in a bid to find appropriate solutions to stop environmental and human risks, as well as to previous unfit*maintenance work*,” Antonelli told Al-Monitor. “We will be conducting*field visits and meetings with local authorities and concerned parties to achieve our objectives,” he said. Antonelli*added, “We are also looking at assessing the impact of the construction of a nearby museum.”*UNESCO has concerns about the visual impact on the minaret of the museum, which is planned by local authorities. Antonelli said “a joint technical committee monitors the quality of the works that are to be implemented and the establishment of a joint project between Iraqi and international experts to formulate a comprehensive plan for rehabilitation.” Al-Monitor met with Algerian archaeologist Mahmoud Bandakir, who is also a member of the UNESCO delegation. “The historical city of Samarra was included on the list of endangered world heritage in 2007. Therefore, several corrective measures must be implemented at the site, which is the government’s responsibility.” He said, “There has been a delay in the implementation of the maintenance works due to the security situation and the lack of financial allocations, which means that Iraq has violated the decision of the World Heritage Committee issued in 2013” whereby governments are tasked with*carrying out suitable*maintenance work. Bandakir said, “After consultations with the local government of Salahuddin province, it has been decided to start work*on the Great Mosque as it is the most damaged — not to mention the previous inappropriate maintenance and rehabilitation work. This is in addition to the bombing of the mosque during the US invasion in 2003.” He said*the maintenance work should be carried out according to*international standards as called for*under the*Venice Charter*of*1964. The head of the parliamentary Media and Culture*Committee, Maysoon al-Damluji, told Al-Monitor, “The coming period will witness a facelift for the archaeological sites and monuments and the establishment of investment projects. The Iraqi Antiquities Authority said the maintenance and restoration works at*the mosque will be financed by the Iraqi Sunni Endowment*using*proceeds” collected from mosque tourists during*Saddam Hussein’s regime. Khalaf said the restoration plan will include “the construction of infrastructure under the requirements of the World Heritage List, which will include a building for the mosque’s administration, visitor guidance center and the development of squares. The project documents were transferred to the World Heritage Center and then sent to the International Council on Monuments and Sites*for evaluation.” He concluded, “We are ready to discuss with them the tourism and cultural investment projects of*the mosque*in addition to other monuments in the city.” Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 34 view(s)
  • RogueTurtle's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:49 AM
    No info yet, still waiting for an update from Warka.
    121 replies | 10966 view(s)
  • Will-it-happen?'s Avatar
    02-24-2018, 08:39 PM
    did any one get their shares liquidated and put into their bank ?
    121 replies | 10966 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    02-24-2018, 04:31 PM
    GardaWorld, a global leader in comprehensive security and risk management, has made its weekly security report available to Iraq Business News readers. Prepared by GardaWorld’s Risk Analysis Team in Iraq, this essential report includes short- and medium-term outlooks on the security situation, reports and commentary on recent significant events, and a detailed overview of developments across the country. Please click here to download the latest report free of charge. For more information on how GardaWorld’s services can support your business in Iraq, please contact Daniel Matthews, Senior Director Iraq, at daniel.matthews@garda.com Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 43 view(s)
  • Lenmon's Avatar
    02-24-2018, 12:09 PM
    hotmail through Outlook
    9 replies | 563 view(s)
  • Mo Dinar's Avatar
    02-24-2018, 02:23 AM
    Ha ha, I think Suzy was also Clay75!
    184 replies | 41237 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    02-24-2018, 01:21 AM
    By John Lee. MENAFN reports that 540 Jordanian goods have been officially exempted from customs duties of Iraq. Jordan’s Minister of Industry, Trade and Supply, Yarub Al-Qudah (pictured) said the decision aims to increase Jordanian exports to the Iraqi market, promoting economic cooperation between the two countries. He added that Jordanian trucks will be allowed to enter Iraq, and vice versa. (Source: MENAFN) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 93 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    02-24-2018, 01:21 AM
    IFC and Central Bank of Iraq to Strengthen Corporate Governance in the Banking SectorThe International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, and the Central Bank of Iraq (CBI) are launching a series of specialized workshops, starting today, to raise corporate governance standards in Iraqi banks and strengthen the country’s banking sector. IFC’s advisory services team will support the Central Bank in implementing its new mandatory corporate governance banking guidelines. IFC will initially train all key managers in the Central Bank and then roll out workshops to board members from all the country’s banks. Topics include understanding the unique nature of governance in the sector, the right composition of boards, and risk management best practice. Aly Al Alaq (pictured), Governor of the Central bank said: “Helping banks implement sound corporate governance practices will increase the sector’s resilience and sustainability and make them more investment-friendly, enabling banks to not only boost efficiency, but also increase profit.” The initiatives are part of IFC’s strategy to spur private sector growth in Iraq and scale up support for fragile and conflict-affected states, where private sector investment is key. For companies operating in conflict-affected environments, strong corporate governance can be vital for sustainability. Ziad Badr, IFC Principal Country Officer in Iraq, said: “Our aim is to foster a positive corporate governance culture within which banks in Iraq can operate, to strengthen the sector and drive growth … Improved practices help attract direct investments and ultimately stimulate social welfare and economic growth.” IFC has been working to improve corporate governance in Iraq since 2014. As well as working with local institutions, in May 2017, IFC launched the country’s first independent institute of directors—the Kurdistani Institute of Directors (KIoD)—alongside the Erbil Chamber of Commerce and Trade, which advises on best practice and strengthening the role of independent directors and boards. IFC’s advisory work in Iraq focuses on building the capacity of financial institutions, supporting governments, helping private firms improve their environmental, social, and governance standards, and mobilizing private investments through public-private partnerships. (Source: IFC) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 47 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    02-24-2018, 01:21 AM
    This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of*Iraq Business News. By Mustafa Habib. Iraq’s Lack Of Water Is A Foreign Policy Problem, Ministers SayOnce it was the extremists who held Iraq’s water to ransom. Now it is tribes in Iraq’s southern provinces using water supplies as a deadly weapon. Last Sunday there was a heated debate in the Iraqi parliament. It was not about the extremist group known as the Islamic State, local militias, the US’ or Iran’s presence in Iraq, corruption or any of the other standard controversies that get MPs yelling at one another. Instead the debate was about water. The country’s minister for water resources,*Hassan al-Janabi, warned that Iraq was about to face a water shortage and that the government urgently needed to make the topic one of foreign policy relevance as well as a domestic issue. An official report prepared by al-Janabi’s ministry was submitted to parliament and NIQASH was able to read it. It said that Iraq had lost around 30 percent of the water it used to get from the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, the two major waterways running through Iraq. Within just a few years, it will have lost 50 percent of its share of the rivers’ waters. And that is without taking into account the impact of climate change. The ministry of water resources said it would begin working on a long-term plan, working toward 2035, which would require an investment of US$184 billion. Of that, US$68 billion would be allocated to water for irrigation and used for agricultural purposes. Over three-quarters of water in Iraq is used for agriculture, industry and for drinking. Iraq has always been proud of its two major rivers. And up until relatively recently the country had been spared the kinds of devastating droughts that have hurt countries elsewhere. Baghdad residents still remember the floods of the 1950s that used to hit the country every summer until a newly built suburban dam ended them. But the situation is very different today. A major part of the current problem lies outside the country’s borders. The sources of the Euphrates and the Tigris, as well as long stretches of the rivers, lie outside Iraq. Turkey, Syria and Iran control parts of the rivers and are already building, or have built, large dams to ensure that their countries have enough water in the future. Iraq, on the other hand, does not currently have the resources to start on such huge strategic projects. The Iraqi government’s abilities are limited to the maintenance of existing dams, mostly built during the Saddam Hussein regime. The most important of these are the Mosul and Haditha dams. Since an earthquake last year, the Dokan dam in northern Iraq has been out of service. Agriculture is being impacted already. “This year we lost about 30 percent of our wheat and barley crops because of water scarcity, drought and low rainfall,” says Mahdi al-Qaisi, the deputy minister for agriculture in Iraq. “That’s something we haven’t seen in decades and we have to reconsider how we irrigate in the country. We need to switch to crops that don’t require large quantities of water,” he argued. “We have been making a living from growing wheat and barley for decades,” says Karim al-Hajami, a tribal leader in the Maysan province. “But this year we suffered great losses due to a lack of water. That’s because the waters of the Tigris river were stolen by people in the Wasit province,” he complains. “And the state knows nothing about it.” What is happening outside Iraq is now also happening inside the country, as provincial councils in southern Iraq fight to divert river water to their provinces or to somehow block the flow further down river. There are also fears that eventually the lack of water will lead to mass internal migration, as people living in drought-stricken areas rush to areas with more water. “Tribes in Wasit are taking more than they should, according to guidelines from the ministry of water resources,” al-Hajami continues. “And that’s why we don’t get enough water.” In fact, a few weeks ago there were physical confrontations between different tribes over water. “They would have become serious if it were not for the intervention of government authorities who promised they would try and solve the problem,” al-Hajami says. However, the farmers in Wasit say that it’s not their fault and that locals even further up river than them are the ones taking all the water which is why they, in turn, have to take more than they are supposed to from the Tigris river. “The people in Maysan accuse us of taking more than our share but in reality, we are not getting our full share because of a problem with the Tigris river and the low level of water coming in from Turkey,” suggests Abbas al-Maksousi, one of the tribal leaders there. The same sorts of problems are coming up in the provinces of Dhi Qar and Muthanna too, where fighting erupted between tribes last month because of anxiety over water from the Euphrates. MP Furat al-Tamimi, who heads the parliamentary committee on water and agriculture, warns that this situation is just going to worsen in coming months. “The problem is complex,” al-Tamimi told NIQASH. “Firstly, the sources of the Euphrates and the Tigris are in neighbouring countries. Turkey in particular is trying to fill its Ilisu Dam*project. And secondly its complicated because of abuses in Iraq’s own southern provinces.” In the provinces, al-Tamimi thinks the ministries of the interior and water resources need to work together to prevent those abuses. “Or we will see more dangerous conflicts in the future,’ he suggests. Al-Tamimi also believes that Iraq’s water should become a part of other ministerial portfolios because it overlaps the trade, energy, oil and foreign policy sectors. In particular, he believes there is special urgency for the ministry of foreign affairs to get involved. Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 45 view(s)
  • windy's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 05:25 PM
    My mantra since 2004 has been "Maybe tomorrow."
    184 replies | 41237 view(s)
  • calstar's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 03:59 PM
    Where is Shotgun suzy? lol
    184 replies | 41237 view(s)
  • Brazileiro's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 03:22 PM
    I imagine most people are like me & still hoping Warka will somehow come back out of the ashes...but I've never heard of a company doing that after being shutdown for this long. I wonder what Warka will do after "depositing" the money from selling clients proxy shares.
    1 replies | 137 view(s)
  • Brazileiro's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 03:17 PM
    mine sent on wednesday from hotmail was received, read & ignored...
    9 replies | 563 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 02:03 PM
    By John Lee. The Islamic State group (IS, ISIS, ISIL, Daesh) has reportedly laundered its cash reserves by investing in legitimate businesses in Iraq and elsewhere. According to a report from The Economist, in Iraq it has used middlemen to buy farms, car-dealerships, hotels and hospitals. It adds that weak institutions and rampant corruption make it hard for Iraq to tackle the problem. Read the full article from The Economist here. (Source: The Economist) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 53 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 02:03 PM
    By John Lee. The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraq: Evaluation of UN Women’s Leadership, UN Women – United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women Security and Humanitarian Access Coordinator, International Rescue Committee (IRC) Senior Child Protection Manager, International Rescue Committee (IRC) Nutrition Coordinator, International Rescue Committee (IRC) Humanitarian Access and Security Coordinator, International Rescue Committee (IRC) Senior Health Manager, International Rescue Committee (IRC) Head of Programme Operations (HPO), Save the Children Education Programme Manager, Save the Children Head of Programme Operations, Save the Children (Source: UN) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 900 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 02:03 PM
    By John Lee. The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraqi Kurdistan: Media Coordinator, Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) Head of Programme, Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) Monitoring and Evaluation Manager, Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) Finance Controller, International Rescue Committee (IRC) Livelihoods Program Manager, International Rescue Committee (IRC) Operations Director, Mercy Corps Education Programme Manager, Save the Children Senior Resettlement Assistant, UNAMI (Source: UN) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 101 view(s)
  • Mo Dinar's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 04:15 AM
    Tried several Aol, Yahoo, still nada!
    9 replies | 563 view(s)
  • Mo Dinar's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 04:10 AM
    2004! The days of Jerry and Aunt Gwennie AND long before Clay75 lol!
    184 replies | 41237 view(s)
  • Pistol's Avatar
    02-23-2018, 01:14 AM
    I joined in 2007 but was a chronic lurker from 2004....still waiting for the elusive RV.
    184 replies | 41237 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 02:55 PM
    By Ahmed Tabaqchali (pictured), CIO of Asia Frontier Capital (AFC) Iraq Fund. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News. ‘It’s Not the Donations, Stupid’: Key Points from the Kuwait Conference With a few exceptions, the coverage of the “Kuwait International Conference for the Reconstruction of Iraq” has been confusing at best, ranging from those who thought it was a failure for raising far less than needed to those who thought that that it was a reasonable success for raising a third of what was needed. These thoughts were not helped by an Iraqi delegation that was focused on presenting a shopping list of projects that would need $88bn in financing. In the end, it was reported that Iraq received pledges of $30bn in loans and guarantees, just over a third of the required total. Lost in all of this is the significant document “Reconstruction & Development Framework” that the World Bank Group (WBG) prepared with the Iraqi Ministry of Planning (MoP), as well as the IMF’s work on Iraq and its presentation at the conference. The first is a comprehensive analysis of the reconstruction requirements across all sectors of the country and provides plans for short-, medium- and long-term reconstruction needs within the framework of a long-term recovery for the country. In combination with the second, they provide the structure for funding the reconstruction effort. The key takeaway is that the Government of Iraq (GoI) is realistic in its expectations that external sources of financings will be small, and therefore it expects to utilize its own resources over the next five years for the required reconstruction. Please click here to download Ahmed Tabaqchali’s full report. Mr Tabaqchali (@AMTabaqchali) is the CIO of the AFC Iraq Fund, and is an experienced capital markets professional with over 25 years’ experience in US and MENA markets. He is a non-resident Fellow at the Institute of Regional and International Studies (IRIS) at the American University of Iraq-Sulaimani (AUIS). He is a board member of the Credit Bank of Iraq. His comments, opinions and analyses are personal views and are intended to be for informational purposes and general interest only and should not be construed as individual investment advice or a recommendation or solicitation to buy, sell or hold any fund or security or to adopt any investment strategy. It does not constitute legal or tax or investment advice. The information provided in this material is compiled from sources that are believed to be reliable, but no guarantee is made of its correctness, is rendered as at publication date and may change without notice and it is not intended as a complete analysis of every material fact regarding Iraq, the region, market or investment. Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 127 view(s)
  • dollarsign's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 10:44 AM
    picking up the pace... Baghdad, Iraq, February 20, 2018—IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, and the Central Bank of Iraq are launching a series of specialized workshops, starting today, to raise corporate governance standards in Iraqi banks and strengthen the country’s banking sector. IFC’s advisory services team will support the Central Bank in implementing its new mandatory corporate governance banking guidelines. IFC will initially train all key managers in the Central Bank and then roll out workshops to board members from all the country’s banks. Topics include understanding the unique nature of governance in the sector, the right composition of boards, and risk management best practice. Aly Al Alaq, Governor of the Central bank said: “Helping banks implement sound corporate governance practices will increase the sector’s resilience and sustainability and make them more investment-friendly, enabling banks to not only boost efficiency, but also increase profit.” ​$
    54 replies | 6478 view(s)
  • BatmaninIraq's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 06:22 AM
    http://www.alsabaah.iq/ArticleShow.aspx?ID=153202 the most important currency market (exchange rate)
    52 replies | 6815 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 03:10 AM
    By John Lee. The Ministry of Oil has announced an opportunity to invest in a 100,000-bpd refinery at the Qayara field in Ninawa governorate. In a statement, the Ministry said: The execution is according to the methods of BOOT or BOO and according to the investment law of the refineries No.64 for the year 2007 and its amendments. The products of the refinery must be environment friendly according to the international standards. The tax breaks must be according to the investment law No.13 for the year 2006. In accordance with the second amendment of the investment law No.64 for the year 2007. The subtraction on the crude oil price over the ship is (8%) “The subtraction must be more than 5$ and less than 10$ of the global price”. The studies, planning and follow-up directorate in the ministry of oil have prepared the data portfolio of the refinery and the price of the data portfolio shall be (30) thousand dollars “nonrefundable”. The closing date of selling data portfolios is at the end of the work hours of Sunday the 1st of April 2018. –* The receipt of the documents from the companies which would like to invest in the above mentioned refinery must be to the end of the work hours of Sunday the 15th of May 2018. The presentation of the documents will be to the Studies Planning & Follow-up Directorate directly in a closed envelop. Otherwise the documents will be rejected. For further information please contact the E-mails (studies@oil.gov.iq) or (studies.oil@gmail.com). (Source: Ministry of Oil) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 87 view(s)
  • James's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 02:21 AM
    Disregard if already posted. https://www.cwciraqpetroleum.com/
    0 replies | 100 view(s)
More Activity
Powered byvBSocial.com and Block Facebook