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  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 12:39 AM
    By John Lee. The*Central Bank of Iraq (CBI)*has reported that 39 banks and 10 remittance companies took part in its currency auction on Wednesday. A total of $150,321,047 sold at a price of 1184 Iraqi Dinars (IQD) per dollar. (Source: Central Bank of Iraq) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
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  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 12:39 AM
    U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, conducting 12 strikes consisting of 32 engagements, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported yesterday. Officials reported details of yesterday’s strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports. Strikes in Syria In Syria, coalition military forces conducted five strikes consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets: Near Abu Kamal, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and damaged a vehicle. Near Dayr Az Zawr, a strike destroyed eight ISIS oil stills and destroyed two ISIS oil truck. Near Raqqa, three strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units; destroyed three fighting positions and a mortar system. Strikes in Iraq In Iraq, coalition military forces conducted seven strikes consisting of 27 engagements against ISIS targets: Near Mosul, five strikes engaged four ISIS tactical units; destroyed two vehicle bombs, two medium machine guns, two vehicles, a storage compound, a fighting position, a rocket- propelled grenade system, an ISIS staging area; damaged 21 ISIS supply routes and two vehicles; and suppressed a mortar team. Near Rawah, a strike destroyed an anti-air artillery system. Near Sinjar, a strike destroyed an ISIS staging area. Additionally, three strikes were conducted in Syria May 22 that closed within the last 24 hours: Near Raqqa, three strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units; destroyed a fighting position, a vehicle bomb and a front-end loader. Part of Operation Inherent Resolve These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said. The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted. Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect. For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said. The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target. (Source: US Dept of Defense) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
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  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 12:39 AM
    The US Army failed to keep tabs on more than $1 billion worth of arms and other military equipment in Iraq and Kuwait according to a now declassified Department of Defense (DoD) audit, obtained by Amnesty International following Freedom of Information requests. The government audit, from September 2016, reveals that the DoD “did not have accurate, up-to-date records on the quantity and location”of a vast amount of equipment pouring into Kuwait and Iraq to provision the Iraqi Army. “This audit provides a worrying insight into the US Army’s flawed – and potentially dangerous – system for controlling millions of dollars’ worth of arms transfers to a hugely volatile region,” said Patrick Wilcken, Amnesty International’s Arms Control and Human Rights Researcher. “It makes for especially sobering reading given the long history of leakage of US arms to multiple armed groups committing atrocities in Iraq, including the armed group calling itself the Islamic State.” The military transfers came under the Iraq Train and Equip Fund (ITEF), a linchpin of US-Iraqi security cooperation. In 2015, US Congress appropriated USD$1.6 billion for the programme to combat the advance of IS. The transfers, which include tens of thousands of assault rifles (worth USD$28 million), hundreds of mortar rounds and hundreds of Humvee armoured vehicles, were destined for use by the central Iraqi Army, including the predominantly Shi’a Popular Mobilisation Units, as well as the Kurdish Peshmerga forces. The DoD audit found several serious shortcomings in how ITEF equipment was logged and monitored from the point of delivery onward, including: Fragmentary record-keeping in arms depots in Kuwait and Iraq. Information logged across multiple spreadsheets, databases and even on hand-written receipts. Large quantities of equipment manually entered into multiple spreadsheets, increasing the risk of human error. Incomplete records meaning those responsible for the equipment were unable to ascertain its location or status. The audit also claimed that the DoD did not have responsibility for tracking ITEF transfers immediately after delivery to the Iraqi authorities, despite the fact that the department’s Golden Sentry programme is mandated to carry out post-delivery checks. A previous DoD audit in 2015 pointed to even laxer stockpile monitoring procedures followed by the Iraqi armed forces. In some cases the Iraqi army was unaware of what was stored in its own warehouses, while other military equipment – which had never been opened or inventoried – was stored out in the open in shipping containers. “The need for post-delivery checks is vital. Any fragilities along the transfer chain greatly increase the risks of weapons going astray in a region where armed groups have wrought havoc and caused immense human suffering,” said Patrick Wilcken. Arms transfers fuelling atrocities Amnesty International’s research has consistently documented lax controls and record-keeping within the Iraqi chain of command. This has resulted in arms manufactured in the USA and other countries winding up in the hands of armed groups known to be committing war crimes and other atrocities, such as IS, as well as paramilitary militias now incorporated into the Iraqi army. In response to the audit, the US military has pledged to tighten up its systems for tracking and monitoring future transfers to Iraq. However, the DoD made almost identical commitments in response to a report for Congress as long ago as 2007 that raised similar concerns. “After all this time and all these warnings, the same problems keep re-occurring. This should be an urgent wake-up call for the US, and all countries supplying arms to Iraq, to urgently shore up checks and controls. Sending millions of dollars’ worth of arms into a black hole and hoping for the best is not a viable counter-terrorism strategy; it is just reckless,” said Patrick Wilcken. “Any state selling arms to Iraq must show that there are strict measures in place to make sure the weapons will not be used to violate rights. Without these safeguards, no transfer should take place.” Amnesty International is urging the USA to comply with the Leahy Law, which prohibits the supply of most types of US military aid and training to foreign security, military and police units credibly alleged to have committed “gross human rights violations”. The USA and Iraq must also accede to the global Arms Trade Treaty, which has strict rules in place to stop arms transfers or diversion of arms that could fuel atrocities. (Source: Amnesty International) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
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  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 12:39 AM
    By John Lee. A plan has reportedly been made to rebuild the areas liberated from the Islamic State group (IS, ISIS, ISIL, Daesh) over the next 10 years with $100 billion in financing. According to Al Arabiya, Iraq’s Planning Minister Salman Al-Jumayli said on Wednesday: “The plan to bring stability and development for the liberated areas will be in two steps. The first will be from 2018 to 2022, and the second from 2023 to 2028. “The government is trying to provide the figure through grants, international loans, and from what has been provided through the general budget of the country.“ The Funding Facility for Immediate Stabilization (FFIS), established in 2015, is currently carrying out immediate projects in the liberated areas. (Source: Al Arabiya) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
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  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:02 PM
    Pope Francis finally finds something he hates about his job.
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  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:57 PM
    Nice shot of a cheerful Pope Francis giving Trump the tour. 'Chairs, floor, walls ... We're done, get out.'----- The Pope
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  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:55 PM
    Pope Francis. Trump. What is it that makes everyone sour around Trump?
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  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:53 PM
    "God....are you testing me?"---- The Pope
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  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:51 PM
    And here is !! The moment everyone was waiting for !! The Pope is thinking..."Why this man..Why Dear God"~~!! And "Oh Lord...did someone died in their family today"?
    5995 replies | 249435 view(s)
  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:18 PM
    Republicans and Democrats dismiss Trump’s budget as ‘dead on arrival’ WASHINGTON — President Trump formally rolled out his 2018 budget plan Tuesday, and lawmakers from both parties wasted no time in pushing back, with many proclaiming it “dead on arrival” and arguing that the proposal goes against many of Trump’s campaign-trail promises. “The president’s budget isn’t going anywhere,” said Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La. Cassidy added that “Trump’s campaign contract with the American people should be fulfilled” by keeping health care costs low, something he said the budget does not do. “This budget exposes all of that verbiage for what it really was, just cheap and empty campaign rhetoric that was meant to get votes,” said Sen. Bernie Sanders, the top Democrat on the Senate Budget Committee. Trump’s budget calls for sweeping cuts to the social safety net, slashing $800 billion from Medicaid over 10 years in conjunction with a health care bill approved by the U.S. House of Representatives earlier this month. Other programs designed to combat poverty, ranging from food stamps to Social Security Disability Insurance, would also see their funding slashed. The document calls for a bevy of tax cuts as well. Mick Mulvaney, Trump’s budget director, claimed that the budget is designed to decrease waste in government spending, spur greater economic growth and erase the federal deficit within 10 years. “We looked at this budget from the eyes of the people who were actually paying the bills,” Mulvaney told reporters Tuesday. “For years and years we looked at the budget in terms of those on the back end of the programs, the recipients of the taxpayer money. We haven’t spent nearly enough time focusing on the people paying the taxes.” But the proposal has met skepticism from Congress, with both Democrats and Republicans noting that the budget is a step away from statements Trump made while running for president. Among other things, Trump assured voters that there would be no cuts to Medicaid under his administration. I was the first & only potential GOP candidate to state there will be no cuts to Social Security, Medicare & Medicaid. Huckabee copied me. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 7, 2015 “ is once again an example of the rhetoric of the campaign not matching up with the reality of governance,” said Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-N.M., who noted that the budget hit rural areas, such as his home state, particularly hard. Sanders further called the plan “immoral,” while Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., slammed the budget for giving tax breaks to the wealthiest Americans. “The Trump budget takes a sledgehammer to middle class and working class Americans, lavishes tax breaks on the wealthy and imagines all the deficit problems away with fantasy math,” he said. Republican lawmakers als distanced themselves from the budget, insisting that they would move forward with their own appropriations plan. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., panned the proposed defense spending as unacceptably low and labeled the overall budget plan as “dead on arrival” in Congress. WH $603B defense budget is inadequate to challenges we face, fails to rebuild military & dead on arrival in Congress https://t.co/8Vcp9fVRhn — John McCain (@SenJohnMcCain) May 23, 2017 Even Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., described the proposal as merely a “recommendation.” “We’ll take things into consideration and move forward,” McConnell said. It is common for a president’s proposed budget to meet pushback. Many of President Barack Obama’s budget plans sputtered in Congress, where the House was controlled by Republicans after 2010. “Almost every president’s budget proposal is basically dead on arrival, including President Obama’s,” Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, the No. 2 Republican in the Senate, said, according to NBC News. Members have said there are elements of the Trump budget that they can work with, however. McConnell touted Trump’s plans to increase defense spending, allowing the U.S. to add over 56,000 service members in 2018. Multiple lawmakers cheered the White House’s decision to reverse course and fund the Office of National Drug Control Policy, which supporters say is critical in the fight against opioid addiction. Even Sanders said he would be willing to work with the president on a proposed $25 billion plan to provide workers with up to six weeks’ paid leave to care for the birth of a new child. “ is a good thought, but it is totally inadequate in terms of its funding,” Sanders said. But any paid family leave proposal faces an uncertain future in Congress. Mulvaney acknowledged that while he had been skeptical of paid family leave in his time in the House, it was a major piece of Trump’s plan to stimulate economic growth. “We try and create the environment where people are more comfortable going back to work and staying at work knowing that if they do have a child, they’ll be able to spend time with that child,” Mulvaney said. Mulvaney will get to make his case at length soon. He’ll defend the proposal at hearings before House and Senate budget committees on Wednesday and Thursday, respectively. Schumer advocated shutting the White House out of the appropriations process altogether and said the proposal “was something you’d expect from someone rooting for the government shutdown.” Instead, Schumer said Congress would be better served acting as they did last month, when he said a bipartisan effort helped avert a government shutdown. “The way we can reach a funding agreement in September is to do what we did last month: work together on a bipartisan basis … and tell President Trump and Mick Mulvaney to stay out of the process and come up with a plan.” As I said many times before.....Donaldof wants, and only wants he and his billionaire buddies to get richer while the middle class and the poor are dragged through the mud....and yeah, you can say whatever, but the thing is that at the end, you are the one paying high premiums, high taxes, high everything with little money left...while the rest goes straight to Donaldof pockets....That is his norm and this shows that even Republicans are against Donaldof ideologies....
    5995 replies | 249435 view(s)
  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:15 PM
    Trump tells Duterte of two U.S. nuclear subs in Korean waters: NYT MANILA (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump told his Philippine counterpart that Washington has sent two nuclear submarines to waters off the Korean peninsula, the New York Times said, comments likely to raise questions about his handling of sensitive information. Trump has said "a major, major conflict" with North Korea is possible because of its nuclear and missile programs and that all options are on the table but that he wants to resolve the crisis diplomatically. North Korea has vowed to develop a missile mounted with a nuclear warhead that can strike the mainland United States, saying the program is necessary to counter U.S. aggression. Trump told Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte Washington had "a lot of firepower over there", according to the New York Times, which quoted a transcript of an April 29 call between the two. "We have two submarines — the best in the world. We have two nuclear submarines, not that we want to use them at all," the newspaper quoted Trump as telling Duterte, based on the transcript. The report was based on a Philippine transcript of the call that was circulated on Tuesday under a "confidential" cover sheet by the Americas division of the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs. In a show of force, the United States has sent the nuclear-powered USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier to waters off the Korean peninsula, where it joined the USS Michigan, a nuclear submarine that docked in South Korea in late April. According to the Times, a senior Trump administration official in Washington, who was not authorized to publicly discuss the call and insisted on anonymity, confirmed the transcript was an accurate representation of the call between the two leaders. U.S. officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, have said Trump discussed intelligence about Islamic State with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Russian Ambassador Sergei Kislyak at talks in the Oval Office this month, raising questions about Trump's handling of secrets. Trump also praised Duterte for doing an "unbelievable job on the drug problem", the New York Times reported, a subject that has drawn much criticism in the West. Almost 9,000 people, many small-time users and dealers, have been killed in the Philippines since Duterte took office on June 30. Police say about one-third of the victims were shot by officers in self-defense during legitimate operations. Folks...you must be mighty ass stupid just to disclose this type of information freely to anyone and everyone as Donaldof Trumpler continues to do and for what now we can conclude, it is his policy, disclose sensitive and classified information to anyone who asks.... Donaldof...ARE YOU THAT MUCH OF A STUPID PUPPET AS TO PUT AMERICAN SERVICE MEMBERS LIVES AT RISK......AGAIN ??....Common Dude...at some point you must show that you have some type, some kind, some common sense of some shape or form !!!!!! I guess his business empire and his business deals are first and foremost THE most important thing going on, so you know, his hotels and golf clubs will be built on those countries without a hiccup in exchange for information....
    5995 replies | 249435 view(s)
  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:00 PM
    Former CIA chief Brennan had concerns about Russian contacts with Trump campaign Former CIA Director John Brennan told Congress that U.S. intelligence found contact between Russian officials and people involved with Donald Trump's campaign at a time in 2016 when the Russians were "brazenly" interfering in the presidential election. "I encountered and am aware of information and intelligence that revealed contacts and interactions between Russian officials and U.S. persons involved in the Trump campaign that I was concerned about because of known Russian efforts to suborn such individuals," Brennan said Tuesday at an open session of the House Intelligence Committee. "And it raised questions in my mind again whether or not the Russians were able to gain the cooperation of those individuals." Brennan added, however, that he did not know whether any collusion resulted from those contacts. Trump has dismissed such a possibility, saying there is no evidence of collusion. Earlier this month, former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testified that there was "no evidence" of collusion in the intelligence community's assessment report on Russian interference — which Trump used to defend himself in a tweet. Director Clapper reiterated what everybody, including the fake media already knows- there is "no evidence" of collusion w/ Russia and Trump. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 8, 2017 However, Clapper clarified to ABC News that he had no evidence available at the time — in January, when the report was released — to show there was collusion with the Russians. "That's not necessarily exculpatory, since I did not know the state of the investigation or the content — what had been turned up with it," he said. In addition, Brennan said Tuesday that because of the sensitive nature of a counterintelligence investigation, not everything that was shared with the FBI for its investigatory purposes was shared with Clapper. Brennan testified that there was a "sufficient basis of information and intelligence that required further investigation" by the FBI to determine whether U.S. citizens were "actively conspiring, colluding" with Russian officials. "I was worried by a number of the contacts that the Russians had with U.S. persons," he said. Brennan said he was concerned because of tactics that Russians are known to use, including trying to get individuals, including Americans, to act on their behalf. Russian intelligence operatives won't identify themselves as Russians or as agents of the Russian government; they try to develop personal relationships with individuals and then try to get those people to do things on their behalf, said Brennan. "By the time I left office on Jan. 20, I had unresolved questions in my mind as to whether or not the Russians had been successful in getting U.S. persons involved in the campaign or not to work on their behalf," he said. Asked if Russia's contacts were with official Trump campaign staffers, Brennan repeatedly declined during the hearing to identify individuals because of the classified nature of the information. A source familiar with the matter told ABC News on Tuesday that National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers was asked by Trump to publicly push back against the FBI probe into Russia's interference in the 2016 election and possible collusion by Trump associates. Brennan said he was unaware of any efforts the president has made to enlist the support of intelligence community personnel to counter the collusion narrative. Warning to the Russians "It should be clear to everyone that Russia brazenly interfered in our 2016 presidential election process and that they undertook these activities despite our strong protests and explicit warning that they not do so," Brennan during his opening remarks at today's hearing. He testified that in an Aug. 4, 2016, meeting he warned Alexander Bortnikov, the head of Russia's Federal Securities Bureau intelligence service, that any continued interference would destroy near-term prospects for improvement of relations between Washington and Moscow and would undermine the chance of their working together on matters of mutual interest. Brennan said he warned that if Russia had such a campaign of interference underway, which had already been reported in the press, it would be "certain to backfire." "I said that all Americans, regardless of political affiliation or whom they might support in the election, cherish their ability to elect their own leaders without outside interference or disruption," he said. According to Brennan, Bortnikov said that Russia was not doing anything to influence the presidential election and that Washington has traditionally blamed Moscow for such activities. Russia has repeatedly denied interfering in the election. Despite his denial, Bortnikov said he would inform Russian President Vladimir Putin of U.S. concerns, Brennan said. He added that the meeting was primarily about Syria but that he also told Bortnikov that Russia's continued mistreatment of U.S. diplomats in Moscow was "irresponsible, reckless, intolerable and needed to stop." In January of this year, a declassified U.S. intelligence report was released that found Putin "ordered" a campaign to influence the election in an attempt to "undermine public faith in the U.S. democratic process." Russia also sought to denigrate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and harm her election prospects and possible presidency, U.S. intelligence agencies found at the time. Trump's Oval Office meeting with the Russians Brennan said it is not unprecedented to share intelligence with Russia or other partners. But he said if reports are true that Trump shared information with Russia's Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Ambassador Sergey Kislyak at a White House meeting on May 10, it violated two protocols. First, classified intelligence of this nature is shared not with visiting foreign ministers or ambassadors but through intelligence channels so that it's handled the "right way" and to make sure it is not exposed, Brennan said. Second, before a person shares any classified intelligence with foreign partners, it is important to go back to the originating agency to make sure that sharing the language and substance is not going to reveal sources and methods, possibly compromising future collection capability, said Brennan. He continued, "So it appears as though, at least from the press reports, that neither did it go in the proper channels nor did the originating agency have the opportunity to clear language for it. So that is a problem." During the meeting, Trump reportedly shared with the Russians intelligence information about ISIS that came from Israel. He has defended his disclosure, arguing he has the right to share such information with Russia. On Monday, while visiting Israel, Trump told reporters, "I never mentioned the word or the name Israel. Never mentioned it during our conversation." Concern over leaks Brennan said he was "very concerned" about subsequent releases of what appears to be classified information purporting to point to the source of the information. "These continue to be very, very damaging leaks, and I find them appalling, and they need to be tracked down," he said. He added that the Russians are "watching very carefully" what's going on in Washington and that they will try to exploit it for their purposes.
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  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:57 PM
    U.S. Why Everyone Should Care That Russia Interfered In The U.S. Election WASHINGTON — Former CIA chief John Brennan had a moving response when asked Tuesday why Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election should matter to the American people. “Why should they care? Why do you care, sir?” Rep. Dennis Heck (D-Wash.) asked Tuesday during a House Intelligence Committee hearing. “Because for the last 241 years this nation and its citizens have cherished the freedom and liberty that this country was founded upon,” Brennan said. “Many, many Americans, brave Americans, over the years have lost their lives to be able to protect that freedom and liberty. They’ve lost their lives also to protect the freedom and liberties of other countries and other peoples around the world.” The United States’ ability to chose its own leaders, free from any sort of outside interference, is an “inalienable right” that must be protected at all costs, Brennan added. “Therefore, I believe this is something that’s critically important to every American,” he said. “It’s very important to me, for my children and grandchildren, to make sure that never again will a foreign country try to influence and interfere with the foundation stone of this country, which is electing our democratic leaders.” “In other words, sir, because you love your country?” Heck asked. “That’s the Cliffs Notes version of it, yes,” Brennan said. Brennan, who spent 25 years with the CIA, testified Tuesday as part of an ongoing probe by the House Intelligence Committee into Russia’s attempt to influence the presidential election and whether Trump’s campaign colluded in the effort. He told House lawmakers that before he left the CIA he was “aware of information and intelligence that revealed contacts and interactions between Russian officials and U.S. persons involved in the Trump campaign.”
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  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:39 PM
    Special Force of Iraq declares completion of Mission Mosul Special Force of Iraq declares completion of mission in Mosul, after it retook the last western district from Islamic State militant group. Source: IraqDirectory.com Post your commentary below.
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  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:39 PM
    Iraqi Dinar exchange rate was stable on 21st May On Sunday, USD to Iraqi Dinar (IQD) exchange rate was stable in Kurdistan region’s currency market. Source: IraqDirectory.com Post your commentary below.
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  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:39 PM
    Zakho of Iraqi Kurdistan turns into drug gateway The Kurdistan Region’s Independent Commission for Human Rights said that Zakho, a district of the region, has turned into gateway of drug trafficking through Iran, Syria and Turkey. Source: IraqDirectory.com Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 32 view(s)
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    Yesterday, 02:39 PM
    Bombing intensifies as Iraqi forces come closer to Old City of Mosul Bombing intensified at northwest of Mosul by Iraqi forces. The forces are trying to capture Old City of Mosul from Islamic State militants. Source: IraqDirectory.com Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 36 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:39 PM
    Iraq is heading towards darkness, unless investment in education increases Economic security and prosperity of Iraq as a nation greatly depends on investment in the education sector of Iraq. The price of investment in education sector is high though lack of investment can destroy future of the nation. Source: IraqDirectory.com Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 31 view(s)
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    Yesterday, 02:39 PM
    US Dollar to Iraqi Dinar exchange rate falls on 23rd May Exchange rate for US Dollar to Iraqi Dinar (IQD) was down on 23rd May 2017 on the currency market of Kurdistan region. Source: IraqDirectory.com Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 37 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:39 PM
    Saudi Arabia and Iraq agreed on 9 months extension on OPEC cut Saudi Arabia and Iraq, two OPEC giants, have agreed on Monday on the need for extending global cut in oil supply so that oil price can rise. Source: IraqDirectory.com Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 31 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:34 PM
    Net oil revenue of OPEC in 2016 was the lowest since 2004 Around $433 billion as net oil export revenue has been earned by the members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in the year of 2016. The revenue is the lowest since 2004. In 2015, oil revenue was 15% higher than 2016 revenue. Source: IraqDirectory.com Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 33 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:34 PM
    Workshop for radio station advertising in Diwaniya concluded by MICT On last Saturday, German media Agency in Iraq has concluded its workshop for several members of the local radio stations in Diwaniya City which is located around 180 KM far from Baghdad on the south. The Academy stated that workshop was arranged to focus on providing training on arts as well as techniques of commercial and marketing. Source: IraqDirectory.com Post your commentary below.
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  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:59 AM
    Funny Reading !!! Trump Is America’s Most Honest President He just can’t help himself from blurting out the truth—even when it’s self-sabotage. “I. Never. Mentioned. The Word. ‘Israel,’” said President Donald Trump, drawing out the syllables, performing hard eye contact with the dozens of cameras, as Israel’s prime minister stood by in a brief press conference in Jerusalem on Monday. Trump spoke in that “make no mistake” way, with notes of the old tune, “I did not have sexual relations with that woman.” If cameras can cringe, these seemed to. Then Benjamin Netanyahu’s stony face hit a new level of stoniness; he drew close to his body the open arms with which he had promised to welcome Trump one day earlier. In an Internet minute, video of Trump’s claim ricocheted around Twitter. Because, of course, in mentioning that he didn’t mention Israel, Trump mentioned Israel, seeming to confirm that the state secrets he had blabbed to the Russian ambassador like a tween with Ryan Gosling gossip did not just seem to point to Israel, but belonged to Israel. Trump’s latest foul will be lost before the week is over; it’s writ on the water of our era’s choppy news seas. But the “Israel” slip indicates something eternal: Donald Trump cannot keep a secret. In fact, the “liar president,” as his opponents would have it, might just be the most pathologically unsecretive—dare I say, honest—president we’ve seen yet. Sure, we’re accustomed to thinking of Trump as chronically deceptive and flat-out wrong, and he commonly is—about crowd sizes, illegal voting, his “fine-tuned machine” of an administration, the Iraq War, 9/11 cheering, the list is endless. But someone must be putting truth serum in Trump’s second scoop of ice cream these days. No matter the stakes, he doesn’t have even a White House junior aide’s gift for circumspection, spin or truth-shading. Lately, in fact, Trump can’t shut up even when almost everything is at stake. In a town of snakes and double-agents, the president’s extreme emotional transparency would be admirable, a sign of vulnerability, sincerity, guilelessness—that is, if it weren’t so self-incriminating. Most notably, on the firing of FBI director James Comey, Trump could not for one single day stick to the simple if ludicrous script that his aides hawked in the immediate aftermath: that Comey was fired at the suggestion of Jeff Sessions and Rod Rosenstein, the attorney general and his deputy, out of gallantry to Hillary Clinton, the damsel distressed by Comey’s political whims last October. No, Trump could not prevaricate. Evidently, the president dies in darkness. And it wasn’t even under interrogation lights that he gave up the truth. He volunteered it. I chopped down the cherry tree, Lester Holt! “When I decided to just do it”—fire Comey, the FBI director, on his own initiative—“I said to myself, I said, ‘You know, this Russia thing with Trump and Russia is a made-up story. It’s an excuse by the Democrats for having lost an election that they should have won.’” It was a flamboyant act of self-sabotage—Trump admitted that he fired the man investigating his campaign’s potential ties to Russia because he was investigating his campaign’s potential ties to Russia—and it unsurprisingly prompted cries of obstruction of justice and calls, ultimately answered, for a special prosecutor. But Trump showed no remorse. The president’s zeal for self-defeating candor can seize him anytime. He admitted to Reuters that the being the leader of the free world was harder than he expected—a worrisome revelation, to be sure, but one that came across as sincere and plainly true. Trump also readily admits his ignorance: He confessed, for instance, that before a short chat with Chinese President Xi Jinping, he didn’t understand why it should be so hard for China to bring North Korea to heel. Trump has also blurted out that he had a good chance of being the first candidate to make money running for president; that he finds healthcare mind-bogglingly complicated; and that he holds anyone who seems even faintly to criticize him, including the sacred cows—from the pope to the press to the parents of U.S. soldier Humayun Khan, who died in action—in contempt. Why the compulsive target practice at his own foot? Doesn’t Trump, the ultimate brand builder and self-promoter, know better? Whatever it costs him in the real world—and the price of his indiscretions seems increasingly steep these days—Trump must always defend his personal supremacy. He hates the suggestion of his campaign’s collusion with Russia not because it could be criminal, dangerous to national security, immoral or even outright treasonous. He hates it for one reason only: It takes away from his November victory. He didn’t win an Emmy, he lost at golf a time or two, but by gum he is the president of the United States. At the same time, if Trump ever kept a secret about anything, it would suggest he had something to be ashamed of. But Trump is free from shame, and instead insists on believing that everything he does—consume cake while launching bombs, hit on married women, lecherously size up his own daughter—merits kvelling. This includes his sleazy affair on his first wife (which he put in tabloid headlines in 1990), his tax-dodging (“that makes me smart”) and his ongoing commitment to Michael Flynn, the disgraced and tainted former national security adviser whom Trump reportedly wants back in the White House. In fact, here’s the secret to Trump’s secrets: They never seem mistakenly to “slip” out, as if he were surprised by his own gaffe and regretted it afterward. Instead, he takes pride in his loose lips. With the Russian ambassador and foreign minister, he was boasting of his “great intel” and, to prove it, promptly burned a key intelligence source (oh, but he never mentioned Israel). With the latest blurt in Jerusalem, Trump, as Cornell Law School professor Josh Chafetz put it, “didn’t ‘accidentally’ confirm that the intel was Israeli. He corralled the press, got their attention, hushed them, & then confirmed it.” Trump doesn’t apologize, temporize or show a split second of embarrassment—like a boy who hams up his burps and then glows with pride. This leaves Trump’s beleaguered surrogates, more seasoned liars, high and dry. On the other hand, it’s a boon to anyone who would investigate him. With a president this boastful about his misdeeds, Robert Mueller, the special counsel appointed to handle the Russia investigation, can certainly forego the Gitmo stuff—and even, maybe, routine surveillance. As David C. Gomez, a former FBI special assistant, told the Daily Beast, “On a big case like this, the ideal thing would be a wiretap on your No. 1 subject. … But in this case, you don’t need a wiretap. He just comes right out and says it.” Can deny this is funny and true....I can imagine what your folks who are hardcore, diehard, kill-and-give-your-life-for this Puppet, the thoughts in your mind everything this Puppet Burbler thing blurbing his irrational confessions: "Wow! Here is the Puppet Burble again!"...Laughing....Laughing !!! But you can't deny that there is a whole lot of truth in this article...and as the Special Counsel begins his investigations, the more Donaldof "The Russian Puppet" Trumpler will increase his burbler tweeting war..and confessions....
    5995 replies | 249435 view(s)
  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:48 AM
    Trump's standing in polls has dropped: How significant is the slide? Trump’s standing in national polls has consistently declined since the end of last month. His approval rating now sits at the lowest point of his presidency. Here are some questions and answers about what the polls do — and don’t — tell us. How significant is Trump’s slide? At the end of April, the share of Americans who disapproved of Trump’s job in office outnumbered those who approved by about 8 percentage points in polling averages. That gap has now doubled. That’s a lot. The percentage who approve of Trump’s job performance is now below 40% in the two major polling averages, done by Real Clear Politics and the Huffington Post. He’s at the lowest level of his presidency so far and far lower than any previous president at this point. What do the most recent polls show? Surveys in the last week range from Gallup’s tracking poll, which shows 37% of Americans approving of Trump’s job performance and 56% disapproving, to a Rasmussen poll of people deemed likely to vote in 2018 that has 44%-56%. Surveys by all the major polling organizations show roughly the same downward trend in Trump’s approval. What’s driving Trump’s numbers down? We don’t really know. Polls, as snapshots in time, can’t readily track people’s reasons for changing their minds. But the timing gives us some strong clues. Trump’s slide began around the time the House started to debate the latest version of the GOP healthcare bill. We know from separate polling that Trumpcare, as Democrats call it, is extremely unpopular. Odds are that the healthcare bill has played a big role in Trump’s slide. Firing FBI Director James B. Comey and the appointment of Robert S. Mueller III as special counsel to oversee the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election surely didn’t help Trump’s standing. But while those events got a lot of headlines, the voters who follow that kind of news tend to be people who pay a lot of attention to politics. Most of them already have strong opinions of Trump and aren’t likely to change. Healthcare, by contrast, touches the lives of a lot of people who don’t pay attention to politics. They’re the voters more likely to change their minds. What do we know about who has turned against him? Compared with his showing in late April, Trump has lost ground among self-identified independents and, to some degree, self-identified Republicans. His standing among self-identified Democrats is so low in most polls that it doesn’t change much any more. Trump remains more popular with older Americans, especially those older than 65, than with those younger than 45. And he’s more popular with whites than minorities. In polling by SurveyMonkey, which collects very large samples that allow detailed analysis, Trump’s support has dropped 10 percentage points since late April among white voters who did not go to college — a group that was key to his victory last fall. That’s a potentially worrisome development for Trump. Trump lost 6 percentage points among white college graduates, and his standing among nonwhites, which was already low, did not change significantly. Trump was unpopular in the fall, but got elected anyway. Does his standing in polls matter? Yes, it does, especially to members of Congress. In the fall, Trump was running against a Democrat, Hillary Clinton, who was also very unpopular. A significant bloc of voters disliked both of them, and a majority of those voters made up their minds for Trump. The situation has changed: Now polls are a straight-up gauge of Trump’s standing, and he, of course, won’t face voters again until 2020. But members of the House, and one-third of the Senate, will be up for election in just over 17 months. Historically, when presidents are unpopular, voters in midterm elections turn to candidates of the opposing party to act as a check on the White House. Are there other hints about how the midterms might go? Yes, there are two sources of information. First, there are off-cycle special elections to fill vacancies in Congress. This spring features several such elections, including one this week for Montana’s at-large congressional district and one next month in a suburban district outside Atlanta. Special elections can give us some sense of how voters are reacting to events, although they’re not always a reliable guide. The other source of information are polls that ask people which party they would like to see win in the next congressional election. So far this month, Democrats have led in that so-called generic-ballot question by an average of about 8 percentage points. In the last couple of decades, as Democrats have come to rely more on young and minority voters, who often skip non-presidential elections, they have tended to suffer in midterms from lower turnout than Republicans. Because of that, they need a significant lead in the generic ballot if they are going to take control of the House. Democrats probably would need a double-digit lead in generic-ballot polls to have a solid shot at retaking control of the House, although no one knows for sure. And, of course, we don’t know whether their current lead will build or shrink as the election gets closer. Don’t polls have a bad record of tracking Trump’s support? No, they really don’t. In November, most national polls were quite close on the popular vote, which is all a poll can forecast. There were a handful of states in which polls were off by a few points. As luck would have it, they were off by just enough in just enough states to get the outcome wrong. That led a lot of election handicappers astray, but it doesn’t mean that somehow polls can’t measure Trump’s support. Their actual track record is pretty good. Also, even if you assume the polls are off by a few points, as some of the state polls were in November, Trump’s support would still be at a historically low level.
    5995 replies | 249435 view(s)
  • millionairetobe71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:44 AM
    Rand Paul to tee up vote on blocking Trump's Saudi arms deal Kentucky GOP Sen. Rand Paul is expected to offer legislation as soon as Wednesday that would block President Donald Trump's $110 billion weapons sales to Saudi Arabia. Paul's planned bill disapproving of the arms deal, confirmed by a Senate source familiar with the timeline, comes as Trump completes the first leg of an overseas trip that began with a warm welcome from the Saudi royal family in Riyadh. Paul recently joined three Democrats in proposing to make future arms sales contingent on reining in Saudi military involvement in Yemen's civil war, and he is likely to take advantage of a 1976 law that allows any senator to force a vote on halting overseas arms sales. Paul partnered with Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut last year in forcing a Senate vote to halt then-President Barack Obama's plans for a $1.15 billion Saudi arms sale. Their effort was defeated on a 71-27 vote, with Republican Sens. Dean Heller of Nevada and Mike Lee of Utah joining 23 Democrats in voting to block the deal. Murphy has worked on a possible bill with Paul, according to a source familiar with the discussions, but it remains unclear how many Democrats are preparing to sign onto the disapproval measure. The Connecticut Democrat also has spoken out against Trump's Saudi arms sales, warning in a Saturday column that the inclusion of precision-guided munitions goes further than Obama's weapons deal and runs the risk that "more — not fewer — civilians will be killed" in the ongoing Yemeni conflict. It makes you think about it....if your own people don't want to work with you...then that sends a signal that there is huge problems within the party....and with Donaldof, problem is the norm.....
    5995 replies | 249435 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    05-23-2017, 11:35 PM
    By John Lee. The*Central Bank of Iraq (CBI)*has reported that 40 banks and 10 remittance companies took part in its currency auction on Tuesday. A total of $154,598,421 sold at a price of 1184 Iraqi Dinars (IQD) per dollar. (Source: Central Bank of Iraq) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 50 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    05-23-2017, 11:35 PM
    U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria on Monday, conducting 27 strikes consisting of 99 engagements, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported yesterday. Officials reported details of yesterday’s strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports. Strikes in Syria In Syria, coalition military forces conducted 18 strikes consisting of 37 engagements against ISIS targets: Near Dayr Az Zawr, five strikes destroyed four ISIS oil trucks, three ISIS pump jacks, and an ISIS wellhead. Near Raqqa, 13 strikes engaged 11 ISIS tactical units; destroyed 15 fighting positions, two vehicles and a weapons cache; and damaged an ISIS supply route. Strikes in Iraq In Iraq, coalition military forces conducted nine strikes consisting of 62 engagements against ISIS targets: Near Abu Kamal, a strike destroyed an ISIS staging area. Near Qaim, a strike destroyed an air artillery system. Near Haditha, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit; destroyed two weapons caches, a fighting position, an ISIS staging area and a house-borne bomb. Near Mosul, five strikes engaged five ISIS tactical units and a sniper; destroyed 20 fighting positions, seven vehicle bombs, six medium machine guns, five rocket-propelled grenade systems, three rocket systems, a weapons cache, a command-and-control node, a vehicle, a mortar system, a house-borne bomb; damaged 21 ISIS supply routes, a tunnel, a fighting position; and suppressed four ISIS tactical units. Near Rawah, a strike destroyed a weapons storage site. Additionally, a strike was conducted in Syria May 21 that closed within the last 24 hours: Near Dayr Az Zawr, a strike destroyed seven ISIS oil barrels, two ISIS wellheads and one ISIS fuel truck. Part of Operation Inherent Resolve These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said. The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted. Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect. For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said. The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target. (Source: US Dept of Defense) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 41 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    05-23-2017, 11:35 PM
    From AFP. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News. After a years-long absence predominantly due to security concerns, international football will return to Iraq when the country hosts a second-round match of the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) Cup. Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 41 view(s)
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