Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 24 Hours Last 24 Hours Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Last 24 Hours Clear All
  • Wolverine's Avatar
    Today, 10:06 PM
    21 replies | 434 view(s)
  • Wolverine's Avatar
    Today, 09:39 PM
    21 replies | 434 view(s)
  • Brazileiro's Avatar
    Today, 06:40 PM
    yep everyone still waiting. looks like they haven't raised the 250 billion iqd yet as weren't they supposed to have the general assembly meeting within 30 days of raising it? then again no one has taken my offer of exchanging iqd for usd at 2x the official rate either so maybe a lot of second thoughts on investing in warka. no word on their mastercard or cd's either. maybe the 2nd half of the year will see something tangible
    8 replies | 373 view(s)
  • Wolverine's Avatar
    Today, 06:39 PM
    21 replies | 434 view(s)
  • crazyfrank's Avatar
    Today, 04:51 PM
    well ok June 20th has pretty much come and gone now, I see zero news anywhere on anything right now, should I really be surprised? ........... so now we return you to your previously scheduled program, already in progress. That is all. :cool:
    8 replies | 373 view(s)
  • Wolverine's Avatar
    Today, 03:27 PM
    21 replies | 434 view(s)
  • Wolverine's Avatar
    Today, 02:59 PM
    21 replies | 434 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 09:00 AM
    By John Lee. Gulf Keystone Petroleum (GKP) has confirmed that a gross payment of $19.7 million ($15.5 million net to GKP) has been received from the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) for Shaikan crude oil sales during March 2018. (Source: GKP) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 29 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 06:52 AM
    By Wassim Bassem for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.* Iraq’s favorite lake dries up in sign of worse to comeKarbala’s*Lake Milh*hasn’t seen a lot of visitors in the last few years. Once a popular picnic*destination for Karbala residents, the lake’s water has dwindled, leaving most of it a*desert*with nothing but derelict fishing boats and*dead animals. The second-largest lake in Iraq, Lake Milh is also known as Lake*Razzaza; it lies west of Karbala and southwest of Baghdad. It is fed by the Euphrates River*as well as rainfall and groundwater sources. Over the last decade, however, it has been*drying up. Saeed Ali, a fish vendor who lives near the lake, told Al-Monitor,*“The lake was an important source of fish in the ’80s and ’90s.*But*with time, it has become a mere pond that*will one day dry out completely if the issue is not addressed.” Furat al-Tamimi, head of the parliament’s Committee for Agriculture, Water and Marshlands, said the situation requires immediate attention. He told Al-Monitor, “The Ministry of Water Resources and the committee are informed of the situation at Lake Milh. We are tracking the declining water levels at the lake with great concern. This is also happening in many other lakes and rivers.” Tamimi*said the*lake’s falling levels*are related to the drought that has plagued Iraq since 2017;*some estimate*the drought will continue*until 2026. But there are*no plans to restore the lake, said Tamimi, a deputy from Ammar Hakim’s Hikmat movement. He said a number of civil society activists and specialists on natural resources in Karbala province have*criticized*the “government’s idleness over the water crisis in Lake Milh,” with some activists working together on*a media campaign to draw the world’s attention to the lake. Engineer Aoun Thyab, the most senior member of the advisory board of the Ministry of Water Resources, said the problem is much more*complicated. “Addressing this problem is not so simple,” Thyab told Al-Monitor. “Protests and calls on environmental groups won’t solve it because the problem is related to internal and regional policies involving the water sector, as well as the rain and streams that flow from the desert.” Thyab said*the*Ministry of Water Resources dropped Lake Milh entirely from its water supply calculations in a 2015 strategic study. “As such, Lake Milh is no longer seen as useful for irrigation, water storage*or fish farming.” He said Lake Milh’s levels decreased from 34 meters*(112*feet)*above sea level to 20 meters*(66*feet) with the drought.*“This was due to a number of overwhelming factors, especially*the decrease in the*Euphrates River, which is the lake’s inflow, because of the*Turkish dams*that reduced Iraq’s water share. Add to this the scarcer rainfall in recent years and the depletion of streams that flow from the desert*around*the lake.” He said, “Lake Milh has also seen higher evaporation levels, which increased salinity, making it effectively impossible for fish to inhabit the lake.” Thyab said*that in the 1990s*the Iraqi Ministry of Agriculture experimented with a project to farm sea fish but that project proved to be a failure. “It is safe to say that the lake is dead.” Thyab’s remarks indicate that it would be next to impossible to restore Lake Milh as a tourist attraction*whose*beautiful flora and fauna once brought foreign and Iraqi tourists from every province. Karbala has also suffered greatly from the armed conflicts in the last decade, most recently*when armed groups who fought against the Iraqi state used it as a base.*The city of Karbala’s practice of draining polluted water*into the lake has also contributed to the problem. But there is hope for the lake yet. In January, the Iraqi National Investment Commission (NIC) unveiled*a $25 million*investment*project*to*rehabilitate and develop*both Lake Milh and al-Habbaniya, a lake linked*to Milh by the*narrow*Sin-Al-Thibban Canal. The project includes building a tourist attraction over approximately 4,000 acres*and overhauling the existing hotels and 200 apartments*to modern standards, as well as a full amusement park, a marina, world-class*restaurants and a media center. The locals worry that the efforts come too late to save the lake. Local*engineer Fayez Eisa, who oversees the area’s*anti-desertification project, told Al-Monitor, “Tired of dealing with the bureaucratic red tape on contracts and permits, the Karbala Holy Shrine administration has established a green belt around 2000 dunams (494 acres) of desert land, where they dug dozens of wells to provide water to the farming areas around Lake Milh.” Lakes*such as Milh represent essential*natural reservoirs in efforts to fight the drought*that*haunts Iraq’s*agriculture sector. Cooperation*with neighboring countries to restore and protect them will be crucial to the region’s survival. (Picture credit: ??? ??????) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 26 view(s)
No More Results
Powered byvBSocial.com and Block Facebook