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  • BatmaninIraq's Avatar
    Today, 10:33 AM
    Security Council Committee on Iraq Removes Entity from its Sanctions List On 7 June 2018, the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1518 (2003) approved the withdrawal of the following entity from the list of persons and entities subject to the asset freeze provided for in paragraphs 19 and 23 of Security Council Resolution 1483 (2003), adopted under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations. B. Entities and other groups IQe.001 Name: CENTRAL BANK OF Iraq Other name (s) known: n / a Formerly known as: n / a Address: Rashid Street, Baghdad, Iraq Registration date: Nov 21, 2003 Other information: Activity: Central Bank ( bank of issue and controller of the banking system) The names of persons and entities removed from the Sanctions List by decision of the Committee are published in the "Press Releases" section of the Committee's website at: https://www.un.org/ sc / suborg / en / sanctions / 1518 / press-releases. To access the updated version of the List of Persons and Entities Subject to Sanctions, Member States are invited to regularly visit the Committee's website at: https://www.un.org/sc/suborg / en / sanctions / 1518 / materials. The Sanctions List is available in HTML, PDF and XML formats. The UN Sanctions Sanctions Checklist is also updated whenever changes are made to the Committee's List. An updated version can be found at: https://www.un.org/sc/suborg/en/sanctions/un-sc-consolidated-list.
    108 replies | 15822 view(s)
  • Wolverine's Avatar
    Today, 02:46 AM
    16 replies | 305 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 12:54 AM
    This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of*Iraq Business News. By Ibrahim Saleh. Multi-Billion Dollar Budget Needed To Keep Iraq’s Water Flowing In Baghdad, locals have been fretting about dramatic falls in the level of the Tigris river. The government has a plan. Only problem is, that plan requires billions in funding that Iraq does not have. The passengers in the small bus all peer out anxiously as the vehicle crosses the Sanak bridge – the name used by locals for the Rashid bridge which spans the Tigris river in the middle of Baghdad. They’re not worried about the bridge though, they’re worried about the water levels. “It’s actually very low,” one passenger says to another. “We should expect that,” his travelling companion replies, “they are trying to drain the water – and the life – out of Iraq.” Salah al-Jibouri is the 47-year old driver of the minibus. The passengers call him Uncle Salah. And he’s been driving this route for years. At the beginning of every Iraqi summer, he always hears these same conversations about the amount of water in the Tigris river. But this time, he says resignedly, it’s more serious and people are really worried. Possibly with good reason. At the time the bus is crossing the bridge, it had only been 24 hours since the Turkish government announced that they had started filling their huge Ilisu Dam to the north. Critics have been talking about the damage that stopping the flow of water in Turkey will do to Iraq for years – but now the problem is clear for all to see, as the Tigris river levels have fallen away dramatically. Locals could talk about little else. Some Iraqis posted pictures of residents who had been able to walk across the river, which usually requires a boat or a bridge to get over. They were also upset with their own government, which seemed to be confused as to what exactly was going on. Turkish authorities quickly moved to calm the situation with the Turkish ambassador to Iraq saying that it would take nearly a* year to fill the Ilisu dam’s reservoir and the Turkish president Tayyip Erdogan announcing that the filling of the dam had been postponed. The Iraqi minister for water resources, Hassan al-Janabi, said that the two countries had agreed upon a way for Turkey to fill the dam more slowly, and without stopping as much water flowing into Iraq. But the problem is far from resolved. Baghdad locals used to worry about flooding in the city during the wetter months. But now, floods are the last thing they need fear. Instead it is the dams being built by neighbouring countries – including Turkey, Iran and Syria – as well as climate change, that are reducing the water flow into their city. Over two-thirds of Iraq’s water comes from tributaries it shares with neighbouring countries. “After these dams were built, Iraq’s share of water decreased by more than 45 percent,” says Zafer Abdullah, a consultant for Iraq’s ministry of water resources. Iraq has agreements with its neighbours about water flow and how much water the different nations need to share. But some of the treaties are not being adhered to, with, for example, the Iranian government reporting that it cannot stick to a previous deal because climate change has decreased the amount of water to be shared. The solution would not be to build more dams, the Iraqi ministry of water resources, has stated. Iraq’s own dams are underutilized and would store billions more cubic litres, if they could. The Iraqi authorities say they have a strategy to see them through until 2035, that would provide water for things like drinking and agriculture. It takes into account the decreased amount of water due to climate change as well as the potential for neighbouring countries to keep blocking or diverting rivers. However, as al-Janabi says, for the plan to work, it requires 24 “urgent and essential” points to be resolved, at the cost of up to US$3 billion. And that is extra funding the Iraqi national budget cannot afford right now. (Picture credit: Mohammad Huzam) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 23 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 12:54 AM
    By John Lee. According to a report from Rudaw, the Kurdistan Region sells thousands of tons of plastic and cardboard waste to Turkish companies who recycle it and sell the products back to Kurdistan. Over the past two years, the KRG had issued 42 licenses to export 431,000 tons of waste plastic and cardboard. Read the full report from Rudaw here. (Source: Rudaw) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 22 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Today, 12:54 AM
    From AFP. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News. UNHCR Special Envoy Angelina Jolie visits West Mosul, less than a year after the city’s liberation. The visit marks Jolie’s 61st mission – and her fifth visit to Iraq – with the UN Refugee Agency since 2001. She arrives in the city on the second day of the Eid al-Fitr, the Muslim holiday marking the end of Ramadan. View on YouTube Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 22 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:00 PM
    By John Lee. Iraq and Syria are said to be considering the possibility of reopening their border for the first time in several years. Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA) reported that Syria’s Deputy Prime Minister Walid al-Moallem sent a letter to his Iraqi counterpart Ibrahim al-Jaafari hoping to increase efforts to reopen the border crossing connectinga the Syrian city of Albukamal and the Iraqi city of Al-Qa’im . (Source: AINA) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 29 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:00 PM
    This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of*Iraq Business News. By Saman Omer. In Iraqi Kurdistan, Final Exam Questions Sold for $100, Posted On FacebookAs Iraqi Kurdish students prepared to take final exams, many found they could read all about the upcoming tests online and cheat if they wished. But where were the stolen exams coming from? At the end of May, around 230,000 students in senior grades in Iraqi Kurdistan started taking final exams. The grades these young people in the semi-autonomous northern region get, will play a major role in their futures – so the tests are important. The exams, held on May 27, start at 8.30 in the morning and as they do, the local authorities have been known to interrupt Internet access. This is supposedly so that students who already finished their exams and leave the examination rooms don’t get to circulate the questions or any advice to those students still working. The students are handed the exam questions in an envelope. On the outside of the envelope are written the words: Very Confidential. Unfortunately, this year, that description has been disproven, as exam questions and answers were leaked on local social media accounts – again. Screenshots showing the exam papers appeared two or so hours before the first exams were taken. Several teachers have complained about it. “What an English exam!” one teacher, who could only be identified by his initials, BK, posted on Facebook. “The answers were posted two and a half hours before the exam was taken.” BK posted screen shots from the account that had leaked the exam materials but, perhaps because this is an extremely controversial issue that has been causing problems in Iraqi Kurdistan for years and seen multiple arrests and dismissals, the original account that displayed the materials closed down. Another teacher in the Juman neighbourhood in Erbil, Tekoshar Hussein, also protested online on June 6, talking about how exam questions were leaking. ”Unfortunately questions are being leaked every day and are being accessed easily by students,” the teacher said. “The last people who get the exam questions are the teachers and the supervisors of the exam halls,” Hussein told NIQASH, adding that he had seen students showing the answers on their mobile phones to the exam supervisors, shortly before testing was to begin. The students told the supervisors that the answers had been posted, several hours before the exam. NIQASH’s correspondent decided to try and find out more and befriended or liked several of the Facebook pages known to dispense the cheating exam answers. This meant staying awake almost all night. It’s common knowledge among the students that the pages will post the illicit information in the very early morning, just before the exams, so that the education authorities don’t get a chance to change anything. On the night of June 5, questions for a senior school chemistry exam were published and on the night of June 6, the questions for a senior school English exam were published on the Facebook and Instagram pages. Both showed up on Facebook two or so hours before the exams were due to take place and before the Internet services were throttled. After they were posted, the leaked exams were then circulated by different students on social media. Screenshots of the information that was posted were later compared to the government-issued exams after the tests had taken place: They were genuine, the questions were all identical. NIQASH then contacted the various different sites that had posted the exams to help students cheat. Given the sensitivity of the material, it was difficult to get any answers from those managing the Facebook pages and Instagram accounts involved. However eventually one of the Facebook supervisors agreed to talk, after being promised anonymity. “We have a relationship with a person who sends us the exam questions on Viber,” the page supervisor told NIQASH. “We pay them US$100, or we send credits to their phone. That’s how we got the questions.” Asked more about who they were getting the questions from, the page supervisor only replied: “We are in Kurdistan and everything is possible.” No further details were given. NIQASH also questioned a number of students, all on condition of anonymity. One said he had received questions from maths and English exams from a teacher, via Facebook Messenger. “The teacher did this to ensure that myself and some of my friends would get good grades in the exams,” he explained. Another older student said he was part of a special Facebook group that had been set up specifically so that exam questions could be circulated among the members. He received the exam questions he needed at 6am on the morning of the exam. At first, he didn’t take them seriously, he says because he thought it was either a joke or a plan to deceive cheaters. But when he eventually took the test, he found that almost all of the questions in his maths exam were the same as the ones he had seen online earlier. A further 18-year-old student told NIQASH she had heard about the leaked questions and she had heard many rumours. She says she also had the opportunity to look at them but she did not – because she was too busy studying. That may have been wise – there were certainly also old exam questions and materials that had nothing to do with this year’s tests online too. Local education authorities’ rules say that an education department representative from each district gets the exam questions in a sealed, signed envelope about three or four hours before the testing begins. The representative then delivers the questions to examination halls and exam supervisors at 8.30am. This means the questions must be being leaked between being given to the district representatives and their delivery to premises where exams will be held. But one might also speculate that the leaks are made at certain times to deflect suspicions from one group or cast them on another one. This isn’t the first time that exam questions have been leaked in Iraq, or in Iraqi Kurdistan. In 1994, a whole grade had to repeat their exams because of this. It is common practice for the government to turn off Internet servers during exams. And two years ago 77 people were fired from their jobs in education in Iraqi Kurdistan – including senior managers and teachers – and some were even arrested. Exams were not retaken in that case. The local education ministry is very sensitive about the subject. Of course we know about the leaks, admits Shirko Hama Amin, an Iraqi Kurdish politician who sits on the education committee in the regional parliament. “But we haven’t spoken to the media about it as yet because we are worried about the students’ state of mind. But we have submitted all the evidence to the ministry of education and we will meet with the responsible ministers and with the exam supervisors about this topic,” Hama Amin told NIQASH. At the moment, education officials are not confirming anything though. “No questions have leaked and we reject these accusations,” Karim Dizayee, the official supervising exams in Iraqi Kurdistan, told NIQASH. “There could be some irresponsible teacher who took photos of the exam questions and then posted them online, while the students were actually taking the tests,” he suggests. But that is all. Once the politicians and the supervisors meet, if any wrong doing is confirmed, then it will be up to local prosecutors to decide how much further this goes. Of course, his office will be investigating, says Dildash Fayez, a spokesperson for the public prosecutor’s office. “But even if we do find evidence of leaks, the exams will not be held again,” Fayez concludes. “It would be impossible. But the law will be brought to bear on those who were behind the leaks,” he promises. Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 28 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:00 PM
    By John Lee. Iraq has reportedly bought 1.75 million tonnes of domestic wheat so far this season. According to the report from Reuters, the is well below a trade ministry’s target of 2.5 million tonnes. The wheat purchasing season began on 16th April and is expected to last until the end of June. (Source: Reuters) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 22 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:00 PM
    By John Lee. Iraq’s Ministry of Water Resources has reportedly banned farmers from planting rice and corn, due to increasing shortages in the country. According to Reuters, Minister Hassan al-Janabi (pictured) has decided to prioritise drinking water, industry and the growing of vegetables. The Agriculture Ministry is said to be embarrassed about the decision, especially as rice and corn are considered strategic and farmers had already prepared to plant them. (Source: Reuters) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 30 view(s)
  • Investors Iraq News's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:00 PM
    Statement by UNHCR Special Envoy Angelina Jolie at Domiz refugee camp in IraqIn my country, when we speak of the Middle East we often focus on conflict and human suffering. And it is true that countless families in Iraq, Syria, Libya and Yemen are suffering from conflict they personally have no part in, instability they cannot control, and extremism that they reject. But on this visit I have been reminded, as I am every time I am here, of the truly extraordinary dignity, resilience, warmth, generosity and grace of the people of the Middle East. And I want to thank the people of Iraq for their generosity towards Syrian refugees and displaced people, and in particular the KRI government, which is setting a model for refugee protection. I’m happy have been here on Eid al-Fitr, and I wish the Iraqi people, the Syrian people, and families across this region and beyond, Eid Mubarak, or Jaznawa Piroz Bit. I am in Iraq to mark World Refugee Day next week. On Tuesday, UNHCR will publish new figures showing that the numbers of displaced people, and the duration of their exile, are the highest they have ever been. At the same time political solutions seem completely lacking, leaving a void that humanitarian aid cannot fill. Words like “unsustainable” don’t paint a picture of how desperate these times are. This is my third visit to Domiz camp in six years. The vast majority of its inhabitants are Syrian women and children. Their lives are on hold indefinitely because of the war. They cannot go back, they cannot move forward, and each year they have less to live on. I met two mothers this morning, both of them widows. They both lost their husbands while living as refugees, to medical conditions that could normally have been treated. And now they are both caring for young aged five 5 and 7 who also have life-threatening medical conditions. When UNHCR’s Syria response was only 50 per cent funded last year, and this year it is only 17 per cent funded, there are terrible human consequences. We should be under no illusions about this. When there is not even the bare minimum of aid, refugee families cannot receive adequate medical treatment, women and girls are left vulnerable to sexual violence, many children cannot go to school, and we squander the opportunity of being able to invest in refugees so that they can acquire new skills and support their families. This is the picture in Iraq, in Syria, and wherever in the world you find refugees and displaced people today. The only answer is to end the conflicts that are forcing people to flee their homes – and for all governments to meet their responsibilities. So this World Refugee Day I hope that people around the world will consider this larger picture: What this level and length of displacement says about our world being dangerously out of balance. What it will say about us if our response is to be selective about when we help, and when we are prepared to defend human rights. And what it will mean for the future if we are unable to provide enough basic humanitarian support for displaced people and unable to find any solutions to conflicts at the same time. That is the situation today, but it is not hopeless. There are millions of refugees and displaced people who want to return home and to work and start over – as I saw in Mosul yesterday, where brick by brick, with their own hands, they are rebuilding their homes. There are countries that are keeping their borders open to refugees, despite all the pressures and challenges. There are aid relief workers who are stretching the aid resources, somehow, to minimize loss of life and provide protection. And there are people around the world who are more committed than ever to defending human rights and basic values. So on World Refugee Day this year I hope that we can find the strength to find a better way forward together: so that we move into a new era of preventing conflict and reducing instability, rather than simply struggling to deal with its consequences. Thank you. (Source: UNHCR) Source: Iraq-BusinessNews.com. Post your commentary below.
    0 replies | 27 view(s)
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