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  1. #5741
    Supporter and Investor! Wolverine's Avatar
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    "it just may be a lunatic you're looking for" -- Billy Joel

    "Thursday is no longer cruciferous vegetables night" --Dr. Sheldon Cooper

  2. #5742
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolverine View Post




    Wolvie....are you a man?....seriously ??



    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  3. #5743
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    Politics
    We just got a huge sign that the US intelligence community believes the Trump dossier is legitimate


    The FBI reportedly used the explosive, unverified dossier detailing President Donald Trump's alleged ties to Russia to bolster its case for a warrant that would allow it to surveil Carter Page, an early foreign-policy adviser to Trump's campaign.

    It's a key signal that the FBI had enough confidence in the validity of the document to work to corroborate it and present it in court. The FBI has been using the dossier as a "roadmap" for its investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 presidential election since last year, the BBC's Paul Wood reported last month. The document itself was not central to the bureau's argument before a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court judge that Page could have been acting as an agent of Russia, according to CNN.

    But the raw intelligence contained in the 35-page collection of memos — written by the former British intelligence operative Christopher Steele, who spent 20 years spying for MI6 in Moscow — apparently helped the FBI convince the court that Page could be acting as an agent of a foreign power.

    Some experts have accused the FBI of having political motivations for entering the document into evidence. Others are skeptical that the bureau would have needed to use the dossier at all to bolster its case against Page, an energy consultant turned foreign-policy adviser. Page was already on the FBI's radar because of his ties to a Russian spy who had posed as a UN attaché in New York City in 2013.

    A former senior intelligence officer, who requested anonymity to discuss the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act process candidly, told Business Insider on Wednesday that using this kind of raw intelligence to build a case for a FISA order was "not uncommon."
    "Bear in mind that what one must do in the FISC is to persuade a judge that there is probable cause to believe that someone is the agent of a foreign power," the officer said.

    That probable cause is laid out in a "declaration," he added, which is the "new federal term for an affidavit." The declaration is then "generally signed by the agency head" — in this case, FBI Director James Comey — "and cites the evidence that has been obtained" by the relevant agency.

    According to officials who spoke to The Washington Post, the FBI's declaration to the FISC "laid out investigators' basis for believing that Page was an agent of the Russian government and knowingly engaged in clandestine intelligence activities on behalf of Moscow."

    The dossier, parts of which have been corroborated by the US intelligence community, alleges that Page was a liaison between the Trump campaign and Russian officials during the campaign. It also alleges that while in Moscow in July, Page and his associates were offered the brokerage of a 19% stake in Russia's state oil company in exchange for the lifting of US sanctions on Russia.

    While the evidence put forward in declarations is "usually obtained from an intercept, it need not be," according to the former intelligence officer. "The evidence need not be of the quality that would be admitted into a trial."

    The bar for obtaining a FISA order is fairly low. But evidence cited in declarations must still be corroborated through an agency's investigations before it is submitted to the court, officials familiar with the matter told CNN.

    Steve Slick, a former CIA operations officer and National Security Council official, told Business Insider that applications for a FISA order were likely to "include material that is less than 100% certain or subject to challenge."

    For the application to be approved, however, as it was in Page's case, the FISC judge and the reviewing officials at the Department of Justice would have needed to be "satisfied" that the application, as a whole, had a "sufficient factual basis," Slick said.

    Page was brought onto the Trump campaign in the spring of 2016 by Trump's former campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, reports have said. He has denied the allegations against him, calling them an "illegal" form of "retribution" for a speech he gave at the New Economic School in Moscow in July, in which he slammed the US for a "hypocritical focus on ideas such as democratization, inequality, corruption, and regime change."

    That trip to Moscow — which Lewandowski approved — raised new red flags at the FBI. The bureau sought and obtained the FISA order shortly after.

    Page told Business Insider recently that he thought the FISA requests were "unjustified." But the government's application for the FISA order has been renewed more than once, and there were contacts Page had with Russian intelligence officials that he did not disclose, according to The Post.
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  4. #5744
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    Former Trump adviser on discussing sanctions with the Russians: 'I can't definitively say' it never came up

    Carter Page, an early foreign-policy adviser to Donald Trump's presidential campaign, on Thursday said he "can't definitively say" the issue of US sanctions on Russia "was never raised by anyone" while he was in Moscow last July.


    Page's conversations with Russian officials last summer have come under scrutiny since an unverified dossier about Trump's alleged ties to Russia named Page as a liaison between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin during the election.


    The dossier said Igor Sechin, the CEO of Russia's state oil company, offered Page and his associates the brokerage of a 19% stake in the company in exchange for the lifting of US sanctions on Russia. The dossier says the offer was made in July, when Page was in Moscow giving a speech at the Higher Economic School.


    Page's trips to Moscow and contact with at least one Russian official last year are now reportedly under FBI investigation, and The Washington Post reported on Tuesday that the FBI obtained a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or FISA, warrant last summer to monitor his communications.
    Page — an energy consultant who worked with the Russian state-owned energy giant Gazprom and later founded his own firm, Global Energy Capital, in 2011 — told Business Insider on Thursday that "there were never ever any negotiations or promises whatsoever by me" to Russian officials, "as per my conversation with Jake and in contrast to the false allegations in the Dodgy Dossier."


    Page told CNN's Jake Tapper on Wednesday that he "never said" anything about Trump being willing to lift sanctions on Russia if he won the election. But on Thursday morning, he appeared to shift his story after some pressing by ABC's George Stephanopoulos.

    "I mean, topics may have come ... I don't remember — we'll see what comes out in this FISA transcript," Page said, moments after saying that he "absolutely" never discussed with anyone in Russia that Trump would be open to lifting sanctions.


    "I don't recall every single word that I ever said," Page added.

    "But what you're saying is it's possible that you may have discussed the easing of sanctions with the Russians," Stephanopoulos said. "Something may have come up ... I have no recollection, and there is nothing specifically that I would have done that would have given people that impression," Page replied.


    Page told Business Insider later that there was "no shift" in his story.


    The US's sanctions on Russia "is a major issue in the Russian economy, for average individuals on the street even if it has had minimal impact on the senior people that have been directly targeted," Page said. "I can't definitively say it was never raised by anyone as mentioned this morning."
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  5. #5745
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    https://spectator.org/confirmed-john...-defeat-trump/


    CONFIRMED: John Brennan colluded with foreign spies in attempt to defeat Trump. A good read.
    Last edited by 40plus; 04-20-2017 at 01:14 AM.
    Nothing will happen with the dinar until the banks go electronic.

  6. #5746
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    Good read, but unfortunately it won't kick the guy who wants to be a millionaire in the nuts...he doesn't have any

  7. #5747
    Supporter and Investor! Wolverine's Avatar
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    http://disobedientmedia.com/the-wate...ment-scandals/

    The Watergate Style Break-In That Covered Up Shocking Wave Of Clinton State Department Scandals

    The U.S. Government Failed To Appoint An Inspector General For Five Years

    Hillary Clinton was appointed to her position as Secretary of State on January 21, 2009, serving until February 1, 2013. From January 16, 2008 to September 30, 2013, the Obama administration had failed to appoint an Inspector General for the Department of State (DS). This led some lawmakers to question DS as to why the agency’s top watchdog position, tasked with investigating the practices of roughly 260 embassies worldwide, had been left empty for more than five years, creating the longest such vacancy in the history of any federal agency. This led Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA), chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, and ranking member Rep. Eliot Engel (D-NY) to write a letter to then Secretary of State John Kerry requesting that he urge the President to nominate a permanent Inspector General for the Department of State as soon as possible. Because DS lacked an Inspector General, Harold W. Geisel, the Deputy Inspector General, was appointed the interim Inspector General of the State Department. Geisel would remain in this position for the next five years, until June 2013.

    In 2013, it was first reported that the Clinton State Department had called off eight separate internal investigations into alleged misconduct by the diplomatic corps during the time that there was no appointed inspector general. Of these eight quashed investigations, the one which has found its way back into the limelight, as a result of the media’s complete blackout of President Trump’s human trafficking busts, is that of the former U.S. Ambassador to Belgium, Howard Gutman. MSNBC’s Chuck Todd detailed these allegations in a video report from early June of 2013.


    much, much MORE
    "it just may be a lunatic you're looking for" -- Billy Joel

    "Thursday is no longer cruciferous vegetables night" --Dr. Sheldon Cooper

  8. #5748
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kickabuck View Post
    Good read, but unfortunately it won't kick the guy who wants to be a millionaire in the nuts...he doesn't have any

    You are damn right about that....that "guy" is not like you....you see, you may...may....have nuts.....that guy you are referring to and talking about...which obviously it is me....have balls....and big ones too.....


    Just so you know.....
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  9. #5749
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    What's Going On with Donald Trump's Fading Tan? An Investigation




    Angry Creamsicle. Cheeto Jesus. Decomposing Jack-o-Lantern
    . These nicknames have two things in common. They're not particularly kind, and they all take aim at Donald Trump's infamous love for tanning, which-thanks to his long history in the public eye-is relatively easy to track.

    We'll start with Trump in 1986, looking decidedly un-oranged:





    Almost a decade later, hints of his tan future started to emerge.
    By the mid-aughts, Trump's skin and hair were *almost* the same color:

    By the time he was campaigning for president, he'd reached peak orange. Here he is on the campaign trail in 2015:

    Trump's apparent addiction to spray tanning became a favorite target for comedians and detractors, and as recently as January he was still looking, well, not *not* orange.



    More recently, however, Trump has been looking considerably less citrus-y.




    There's a lot about Donald Trump that we can never understand or unpack, but this? This seems doable. So let's dig deep into an investigation of what appears to be Trump's breakup with his spray tan.

    To get to the bottom of things, we reached out to an expert who's worked with Trump personally-Cleveland-based makeup artist Jason Kelly, who handled Trump's look (and a slew of other prominent Republicans) at the 2016 Republican National Convention.

    While Trump arrived at the RNC with most of his hair and (very minimal) makeup done, Kelly put on finishing touches to get him camera-ready-which gave him an up-close and personal look at the POTUS' complexion.

    Are you sitting down? Because Kelly's expert opinion about Trump's spray tan habit is almost guaranteed to surprise you. Trump might *never* have had a spray tan addiction to begin with.

    "He didn't have any liquid or cream foundation on, or spray tan actually," Kelly reveals, explaining that the key to spotting a spray tan is all in the knuckles (or elbows/knees/anywhere the body bends), where you'll see creases that give the tan away. "The newer ones nowadays are a lot better, but I have an eye for it and I can spot it a mile away."

    What's more, Kelly reports that the orange tone we see in pictures might be more a result of lighting than of Trump's tanning routine. "When I met him, he didn't really look orange at all," Kelly explains. "Not the way he did in all the previous pictures I had seen when I was doing my homework."

    But Trump *has* changed his tanning routine recently, in a very public way.


    While Kelly doesn't think Trump was spray tanning (at least not leading up to the RNC), he does think the POTUS frequented tanning beds-as evidenced by the light rings around his eyes that are a dead giveaway for goggle use.

    "I could tell he definitely does the tanning bed-or some sort of tanning with some sort of light-because he has that abrupt contrast around his eyes where they wear those goggles," Kelly says, adding that we're probably noticing a more natural complexion on Trump nowadays because his tanning habits have changed. Instead of soaking up artificial light, he's getting the real thing...out on the golf course.

    Guess that means at least one not objectively terrible thing that has come out of Trump's frequent travel to Florida, right?
    Last edited by millionairetobe71; 04-21-2017 at 08:28 PM.
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  10. #5750
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    Politics House Committee Restarts Probe of Russia's Election Meddling


    The House Intelligence Committee is stepping up its probe into Russian interference in last year’s U.S. election, seeking testimony from five key witnesses including FBI Director James Comey and National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers.


    Both have been asked to testify in a closed hearing on May 2, according to a statement Friday from the panel. In addition, the committee asked three former officials from President Barack Obama’s administration -- CIA Director John Brennan, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates -- to testify publicly at an unspecified later date.



    The planned hearings reflect that a probe that ran aground is now resuming after the committee’s chairman was forced to recuse himself. But partisan differences persist: Democrats want to focus on the finding of U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia meddled in the election to help Donald Trump win, while some Republicans agree with Trump that the real issue is whether Obama’s administration spied on Trump’s campaign and leaked what they found.



    Comey already delivered explosive public testimony to the House committee in March, when he confirmed that the Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating whether there was collaboration between Trump ’s associates and Russia during the presidential campaign. He also testified that there’s no evidence to support the president’s allegation that Obama “wiretapped” Trump Tower last year.
    More from Bloomberg.com: Trump Says He Wants Obamacare Bill and to Keep Government Running
    Chairman’s Recusal

    The invitations to current and former officials came two weeks after Representative Devin Nunes, the committee’s chairman, recused himself from the probe. He came under criticism for his handling of classified material, obtained from White House officials, that he said showed Obama administration officials “unmasked” the identities of people close to Trump who were mentioned in legal surveillance of foreign individuals.
    Rather than share the information with other committee members, the California Republican held a press conference and then returned to the White House to brief Trump.


    The top Democrat on the committee, Adam Schiff of California, had demanded Nunes step aside from the investigation, saying Nunes had compromised the integrity of the committee’s work.


    Now, Republican Representative Mike Conaway of Texas is leading the Russia inquiry while the House ethics committee examines complaints that Nunes made unauthorized disclosures about the classified information. Republican members Trey Gowdy of South Carolina and Tom Rooney of Florida -- both former prosecutors -- have been preparing to question witnesses.


    In the Senate, Republican and Democratic leaders of the Intelligence Committee say they trust each other and are proceeding with their own investigation into Russian meddling, including the hacking and release of Democratic emails and possible collaboration.
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

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