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Thread: Make America Great Again !!!

  1. #6191
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 40plus View Post
    Wasn't there a poster called "China Girl" years ago that was banned for doing far less bashing against the pro-dinar posters than Mill-toby-Bs-Moron is currently doing towards pro-Trump posters here?

    Are there no rules for civil discussion on this forum? I thought there were, in the past. I have 'flagged' a few of the self proclaimed "Moron's" posts to administration, but received no reply. Any others care to ask for admin's help to 'drain the swamp' a bit?

    So you are saying the same thing Donaldof is saying....suppress the press to your benefit?.....

    This is the opinion forum buddy.... I am just posting my opinion....but there facts with it...but this is my theory here...

    You guys voted for Donaldof because you guys hated Obama, not because in your own squishy guts felt Trumpler was the best candidate, because the present facts shows that it is not, but more because you guys hated a black ELECTED PRESIDENT. So now you have this huge mess from the very very beginning and all you who voted for him are in the most deniability state. You guys want a stable government under Donaldof but it is just not possible and it won't be until he is effectively removed from the Office. Then you have every single day bad news one after another after another after another and so on, and it seems you guys can't catch a break. But you still in deniability. But as long as you keep your eyes close, you will remain in deniability because you can't fathom your man doing any wrongdoing, despite all the signs and symptoms from the very beginning and that is all because you guys hated Obama. Granted, Hillary was not the best candidate either, and I must admit that. However, given the two choices, I voted for none of them.....John McCain was my choice.

    Now....you have this wonderful man...named Me. Posting news after news after news and it seems like I am the torn on the side of your foot....or the like rock in your show in a Prom night. Am I not?....but you can't digest that.. Because you feel you must have the power and control because your man in the Office act the very same way....no power and control?.....then you would feel powerless....just like you felt for the 8 years Obama was in the office...didn't you?

    Ahh....but you want to have a civil discussion?.....go ahead....let's have one.


    You are forgetting that you set the tone for the civil discussions, but, in your Trumpler's mind, if is not Pro Trump, there are no civil discussions. So why don't you look back and re-read the replies to my posts are the very beginning and then come back and tell me what civil discussions are supposed to look like. Here is your answer to your own questions... You called people here "Moron's"....but like at you....whining like a little girl who can't play with her own dolls.....LOL....dude..you are ridiculously funny....

    So don't whine and complaint if you can't practice what you preach. And that is not only for you, but for all others just like you.
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  2. #6192
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    FINALLY !!!!

    Trump: ‘I am being investigated’


    President Trump confirmed Friday he is under investigation for firing FBI Director James Comey.

    In a series of tweets, Trump lashed out against the investigation into whether his campaign colluded with Russia to influence the 2016 election. The probe has reportedly expanded to include whether Trump fired Comey in an attempt to obstruct justice.

    He also claimed that the person investigating him advised him to fire Comey, though it’s unclear whom he was referring to. Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from the investigation and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appointed Mueller to oversee it in the wake of Comey’s ouster.


    When Trump fired Comey, Rosenstein drafted a memo accusing the FBI director of bungling the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s email server and Sessions wrote a letter saying the dismissal was warranted. Mueller has not made any public comments about Comey.

    Until Trump’s Friday-morning Twitter burst, only the Washington Post’s sources had indicated that Trump was being investigated for possible obstruction of justice.

    The missive was the latest in an ever-escalating tirade targeting the Russia inquiry.



    No wonder he wants to fire Mueller....but he knows he can't....it will have such a negative impact that affect the entire GOP.....

    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  3. #6193
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    Trump proved James Comey right on a major part of their dispute

    If there is one thing the White House has sought to hammer home about the FBI investigation into Russia's meddling in the 2016 election, it is that President Donald Trump was not a subject of it.

    The point was so important to Trump that he repeated it in his letter firing FBI Director James Comey.

    "I greatly appreciate you informing me, on three separate occasions, that I am not under investigation," he wrote.

    When Comey told Congress last week that he had, in fact, confirmed to Trump on at least two occasions that he wasn't under investigation, Trump and his allies said they felt "vindicated," even though the investigation into his campaign team was ongoing. And they continued to rail on "innuendo" that the president's interactions with Comey were unethical or illegal in any way.

    But when The Washington Post reported on Wednesday night that Robert Mueller, the special counsel overseeing the FBI's probe, was investigating whether Trump obstructed justice, the talking points circulated by the Republican National Committee did not dispute the accuracy of the report. Neither did Trump's lawyer, Marc Kasowitz.

    According to Axios and The Daily Beast, that's at least partly because Trump's aides and people close to him know that Comey's version of events — that Trump asked him for loyalty, to back off the investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and to announce publicly that Trump himself was not under FBI investigation — is most likely accurate.

    Similarly, White House officials "assume [Trump] did, indeed, ask Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and Mike Rogers, head of the National Security Agency, if they could help derail the Flynn probe," Axios' Mike Allen reported. "They also assume he said similar things to other officials."

    Having fielded Trump's requests, Comey was likely to have sensed that the president would not let the FBI get in the way of clearing his name and would pressure those he considered allies to find ways to intervene on his behalf. Even if Comey didn't predict as much, however, he made clear in his testimony last week that he took Trump's comments about the Flynn investigation — "I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go" — as an order.

    Which is all to say: Comey — who has said he documented every interaction with Trump because he was often "stunned" by the president's overtures — couldn't announce publicly that Trump was not under FBI investigation because the likelihood that he soon might be increased with every public and private comment Trump made about the Russia probe.

    'The (Puppet) president did this to himself'

    "Keep him away from Twitter, dear God, keep him away from Twitter," one Trump aide told The Daily Beast when asked about the White House's game plan. "The president did this to himself."

    Trump's obsession with clearing his name most likely muddied the situation even further. The angrier he became with Comey for refusing to say publicly that he was not a subject of the investigation, the more he tweeted about it and asked the people around him to interfere.

    At that point, as Trump had essentially built an obstruction-of-justice case against himself, for Comey to testify publicly that Trump was not being investigated would have been shortsighted and, as The Post made clear on Wednesday, ultimately incorrect.

    "Just to be clear, for you to make a public statement that he was not under investigation would not have been illegal, but you felt it made no sense because it could potentially create a duty to correct, if circumstances changed?" Republican Sen. Marco Rubio asked Comey last week.

    "Yes, sir," Comey replied. "We wrestled with it before my testimony where I confirmed that there was an investigation. And there were two primary concerns. One was it creates a duty to correct, which I've lived before, and you want to be very careful about doing that. And second, it's a slippery slope, because if we say the president and the vice president aren't under investigation, what's the principled basis for stopping?"

    'He seems committed to uncovering any cover-up'


    Comey had already made that mistake once, when he announced last summer in a highly publicized press conference that the FBI was closing its investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server and wasn't recommending criminal charges. His decision to take it upon himself, rather than leave it to the Department of Justice, to close the Clinton email probe severely damaged his reputation with both Democrats, who thought he'd gone rogue, and Republicans, who felt he'd let Clinton off the hook.

    The precedent Comey had set for radical transparency about the Clinton probe also compelled him to tell Congress, 11 days before the election, that the FBI was reopening the case after finding new, potentially consequential documents. They were ultimately immaterial to the investigation, and the FBI did not alter its initial findings that Clinton did not commit a crime.

    Comey has insisted he would not handle the Clinton probe differently if given the chance to do it over. But he's been far less willing to comment on the counterintelligence investigation into Russia's election interference than he was about the email probe — perhaps because he noticed that remaining silent tended to be the most effective way of getting Trump to talk.

    "The Russia-Trump collusion story is a total hoax, when will this taxpayer funded charade end?" Trump tweeted on May 8.

    The next day, Trump fired Comey. He later acknowledged — both to Russian diplomats and to NBC's Lester Holt — his aim was to make the "Russia thing" go away.

    "What is most remarkable is that the president has willingly created this self-portrait," Bob Bauer, a White House counsel under President Barack Obama, wrote in Lawfare last month.

    "As scandals-in-the-making go, this one may become famous for featuring the president as the principal witness against himself: he seems committed to uncovering any cover-up."


    Common Folks...ya'll can't deny that this is fun to watch unraveling....

    Donaldof will soon request a
    self-impeachment process on the basis of self-acknowledging his self-incrimination against his own self-induced compulsive behavior that lead directly to his own self-involvement in his own self-planned Russian Party....what more to say his "self"??.....
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  4. #6194
    Supporter and Investor! Wolverine's Avatar
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    "it just may be a lunatic you're looking for" -- Billy Joel

    "Thursday is no longer cruciferous vegetables night" --Dr. Sheldon Cooper

  5. #6195
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolverine View Post



    Hummm....this needs to be corrected....there isn't "from all walks of life comes together"....Only Russians and....






    Trump won white voters by a margin almost identical to that of Mitt Romney, who lost the popular vote to Barack Obama in 2012. (Trump appears likely to lose the popular vote, which would make him only the fifth elected president to do so and still win office.) White non-Hispanic voters preferred Trump over Clinton by 21 percentage points (58% to 37%), according to the exit poll conducted by
    Edison Research for the National Election Pool. Romney won whites by 20 percentage points in 2012 (59% to 39%).
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  6. #6196
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    Trump appears furious with his deputy attorney general after a wild 2 days — and 'resignation is a real serious possibility'

    President Trump appears increasingly angry with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein — and experts say a resignation or firing could be coming next.

    The president's feelings seemed to boil over in a Friday-morning tweet, possibly aimed at Rosenstein, in which Trump seemed to admit that he is under investigation, a claim reported by The Washington Post earlier this week.

    The Post reported that special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election has expanded to include a probe into whether Trump committed obstruction of justice with his firing of former FBI Director James Comey last month. Mueller is also investigating whether Trump associates committed financial crimes.

    "I am being investigated for firing the FBI Director by the man who told me to fire the FBI Director!" Trump wrote. "Witch Hunt."
    Rosenstein, who wrote a memo cited by Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions as the basis for Comey's firing, oversees Mueller, making the final calls about personnel, resources, and any prosecutions that would potentially arise from the investigation.

    While it was not 100% clear that Trump meant Rosenstein when he wrote "the man who told me to fire the FBI Director" — the White House referred Business Insider to Trump's private legal team when asked who the president was referencing in his tweet — it came after a roughly week-long series of events that seemed to suggest the president was targeting the deputy attorney general, who hired Mueller as special counsel in mid-May following the firestorm that ensued from Trump's controversial firing of Comey. It was Comey's firing that proved to be the catalyst for the obstruction of justice probe.

    But the timing of Trump's tweets seems strange.

    On Thursday night, a day after the Post reported that Trump was under criminal investigation, and hours after Trump blasted what he called the "phony collusion with the Russians story" on Twitter, Rosenstein issued a curious statement suggesting that US citizens should "exercise caution before accepting as true any stories attributed to anonymous 'officials,' particularly when they do not identify the country – let alone the branch or agency of government – with which the alleged sources supposedly are affiliated."

    "Americans should be skeptical about anonymous allegations," Rosenstein added. "The Department of Justice has a long-established policy to neither confirm nor deny such allegations."

    Robert Chesney, a University of Texas law professor and cofounder of the Lawfare blog, told Business Insider in an email that the timing of Trump's tweet "apparently (though not all that clearly)" attacking Rosenstein is a head-scratcher.

    It "is especially odd given that Rosenstein himself just last night issued a very uncharacteristic, Trump-friendly, statement attacking the media by implying that reporters have been disguising foreign government sources as US government sources," he said.

    The statement came amid reports that Trump is both growing increasingly agitated by the special counsel probe and has considered firing Mueller. Comments from Trump confidant and Newsmax CEO Chris Ruddy and a New York Times story on Trump reportedly considering ousting Mueller apparently led officials to leak to the Post that the investigation included probing possible obstruction of justice. These stories would make it more difficult for Trump to remove Mueller without increased backlash.

    During testimony before the House and Senate appropriations committees Tuesday, a day after Ruddy told PBS "NewsHour" that Trump was considering firing Mueller, Rosenstein assured the committee that he would not do so unless he saw good cause, adding that he is "confident" Mueller "has full independence" to conduct the investigation. Rosenstein also said "there is no secret plan" to fire the special counsel "that involves me."

    Just after Trump's Friday tweet, ABC News reported that Rosenstein has privately told his colleagues that he's considering recusing himself from the investigation, according to sources. Rosenstein oversees the special counsel since Sessions recused himself in early March from any matters involving the Trump campaign. If he were to recuse himself, Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand, third in command at the DOJ, would be next in line to oversee the special counsel.

    Sources told ABC News that Rosenstein discussed his possible recusal in a recent meeting with Brand. Rosenstein told Brand that she would take over if he were to recuse himself from the matter.

    A Department of Justice spokesperson told CNN that the deputy attorney general will recuse himself "if there comes a point where to needs to."
    "However, nothing has changed," the spokesperson added.

    Additionally, one of the main points of contention between Trump and Rosenstein, aside from Rosenstein's appointment of Mueller, is the memorandum Rosenstein wrote which was included in the rationale for firing Comey in May.
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  7. #6197
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    Trump appears furious with his deputy attorney general after a wild 2 days — and 'resignation is a real serious possibility'

    In his Friday tweet, Trump insisted that "the man who told me to fire" Comey is now investigating the president. In a private meeting with senators and representatives last month, Rosenstein said his memo was not a directive to fire Comey. But Rosenstein, in that same meeting, did defend the memo and the reasons he listed for why the FBI could benefit from new leadership. Comey's firing was recommended by Sessions, who cited Rosenstein's recommendation letter.

    "On May 8, I learned that President Trump intended to remove Director Comey and sought my advice and input," Rosenstein said in the meeting. "Notwithstanding my personal affection for Director Comey, I thought it was appropriate to seek a new leader. ... "I wrote a brief memorandum to" Sessions "summarizing my longstanding concerns about Director Comey’s public statements concerning the Secretary [Hillary] Clinton email investigation. I chose the issues to include in my memorandum."

    During an interview with NBC News' Lester Holt shortly after firing Comey, Trump said it was his "decision" to fire Comey and he would have done it "regardless of recommendation."

    He made a recommendation," Trump said of Rosenstein. "He's highly respected. Very good guy, very smart guy. And the Democrats like him. The Republicans like him. He had made a recommendation. But regardless of recommendation, I was going to fire Comey knowing there was no good time to do it. And in fact, when I decided to just do it, I said to myself — I said, you know, this Russia thing with Trump and Russia is a made-up story. It's an excuse by the Democrats for having lost an election that they should've won."

    Chesney said the Friday Twitter episode is adding to the already-strong speculation that Trump is going to try and fire Mueller. The easiest way for him to do so — what Chesney called the "front door" way — would be to simply ask Rosenstein to do so and have him comply.

    But "tweets like this of course make it even less likely Rosenstein would comply," he said.

    If Trump fired Rosenstein, and Brand became the one overseeing Mueller, Chesney said he'd find it highly unlikely she'd comply as well. That of course, Chesney said, could then lead Trump to fire her as well.

    "But Trump might also try to avoid a confrontation with Rosenstein and Brand by instead going the 'nuclear' route: attempting to directly abolish the Office of Special Counsel altogether," Chesney said.

    Andrew Wright, former associate counsel to President Barack Obama and Vice President Al Gore, told Business Insider that Trump's Friday tweet doesn't have a huge impact on the legal situation, but it does add to the "downward spiral on the political environment" where the investigations — both those in and out of Congress — are taking place.

    "He is boxing himself into a corner ... by criticizing these folks without cause," Wright, now a professor at Savannah Law School, said. "He's making it much more politically difficult for natural allies in Congress to support the decisions he makes."

    Wright said leaders in the DOJ and the White House counsel should be explaining to Trump why such attacks are not a good thing.
    "Someone's got to be protecting the Department of Justice from that type of interference," he said. "Wildly inappropriate for the president to be commenting publicly and attacking officials at the Department of Justice who are trying to administer criminal laws."

    While word of a possible Rosenstein recusal from the matter went public Friday, Wright said the deputy attorney general's "resignation is a real serious possibility here."

    But "if you're Rosenstein, you have a real obligation to stay and take the heat," he added. And "be in a shock absorber role."

    Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California — a top member on the Senate Judiciary and Intelligence committees — said after Trump's tweet that she's "growing increasingly concerned" that Trump will attempt to fire both Mueller and Rosenstein following Trump's Friday tweet.

    "The message the president is sending through his tweets is that he believes the rule of law doesn’t apply to him and that anyone who thinks otherwise will be fired," she said in a statement. "That’s undemocratic on its face and a blatant violation of the president’s oath of office."

    She said that Trump has "no authority" to fire Mueller, instead pointing to Rosenstein as the official whom holds that power. That could change, however, if Trump is able to rescind the special counsel regulation.

    The other path would be firing Rosenstein and replacing him with another official who will "shut down the investigation," as Feinstein said. The California Democrat said Trump is "in for a rude awakening" if he thinks he can go about removing Mueller in that fashion.

    "Even his staunchest supporters will balk at such a blatant effort to subvert the law," she said. "It's becoming clear to me that the president has embarked on an effort to undermine anyone with the ability to bring any misdeeds to light, be that Congress, the media or the Justice Department. The Senate should not let that happen. We're a nation of laws that apply equally to everyone, a lesson the president would be wise to learn."
    Last edited by millionairetobe71; 06-17-2017 at 03:02 AM.
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

  8. #6198
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolverine View Post
    I was once banned from IIF for calling a, then prominent, HUGH poster a "taterhead".
    Attachment 181

    ....that being said, when you are dealing with an obviously mentally & emotionally unstable poster, it is best to simply add said poster
    to your "ignore list". This is a great great forum feature, all I ever see (if logged in) is:

    This message is hidden because millionairetobe71 is on your ignore list.
    I remember that. Those were the days. I've been banned under another name.

    Yea, I've got the moron on ignore..so I see page after page of those messages. Every once in a while I will click on one just to remind myself how insane some can get behind a keyboard.
    [Still kicking]

  9. #6199
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolverine View Post

    Amen to that.
    [Still kicking]

  10. #6200
    Supporter and Investor! millionairetobe71's Avatar
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    Now..this is the coolest piece of news...ever !!!! Folks...when things like this happens....you know the crap that is hitting the fan is serious....otherwise....what would be the point?.....Top Lawyers are not cheap....and you only use them when you needed when there is a criminal investigation going on...so....

    Politics Donald Trump's personal lawyer hires his own lawyer amid Russia investigation

    Mmm. Not very good optics here.

    As the federal probe into possible collusion with Russia expands and members of the White House staff rush to get legal representation, it has emerged that Donald Trump’s personal lawyer has felt the need to retain his own attorney.


    NBC reporter Katy Tur said that Michael Cohen, who advises Mr Trump on many personal issues, had hired Washington attorney Stephen Ryan.
    “Exclusive: Trump personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, has hired his own counsel: Stephen Ryan, of McDermott, Will & Emery - source w knowledge,” Ms Tur wrote on Twitter.


    She added: “Cohen will testify in front of House Intel on Sept 5. House intel source says the delay is due to scheduling and logistics.”


    Mr Ryan’s law firm said in a statement to The Independent: "Steve Ryan of McDermott Will & Emery has been retained to represent Michael Cohen, Esq of NYC in all aspects of the government’s inquiries regarding the Russia investigations. Mr Cohen intends to cooperate with all governmental inquiries.”


    The report comes amid revelations that many members of the senior White House staff have retained lawyers to assist them with any queries from the federal probe, being headed by special counsel Robert Mueller.


    Mr Trump has retained Marc Kasowitz to assist him with the inquiry. Meanwhile, earlier this week it was confirmed that Vice President Mike Pence had also hired a lawyer, Richard Cullen, a former United States attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia.


    “The vice president is focused entirely on his duties and promoting the president’s agenda and looks forward to a swift conclusion of this matter,” Mr Pence’s communications director, Jarrod Agen, said in confirming the hiring.
    "We are ready for an unforeseen event that
    may or may not occur." --Al Gore, VP :swear:

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