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Thread: Coordinated Global Currency INTEREVENTION - Continued

  1. #441
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Jay View Post
    Iran, Russia Replace Dollar with National Currencies in Trade Exchanges

    http://goldsilver.com/news/iran-russ...ade-exchanges/
    The actual facts are that the Iran sanctions are taking effect and the Iran Central bank can neither buy or sell dollars. The rial has dropped more than 50% aganist the dollar and may soon be worthless. Since no one will accept the Iranian currency in trade, Russia and other countries as China and India have agreed to buy Iran's oil using their native currency. Russia buys Iran's oil using rubbles to buy oil and in turn Iran spends them back for trade goods from Russia. Iran is then forced to buy goods only from countries which do not accept the sanctions and buy their oil. Their world trade is restricted and they are facing economic collapse.

    http://news.yahoo.com/irans-ahmadine...112735157.html
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    Expect China to Shape the Next Bretton Woods Pact: Philip Coggan


    When the world economy heads into crisis, the international currency system often breaks down. This occurs either because debtors can’t meet their obligations, or because creditors fear they are not being repaid in sound money. The first condition exists today in the euro zone; the second is likely to emerge in the China-U.S. relationship.

    So how might these conditions change the system? Much discussion concerns whether the U.S. dollar will be replaced as the global reserve currency by the Chinese yuan or whether it will simply be one of a number of reserve currencies that includes the euro, yuan and yen.

    The global reserve currency is the one that forms the largest proportion of the holdings of central banks. More broadly, it is also the currency most likely to be accepted by merchants worldwide. In my view, the debate about whether the dollar will be replaced by the yuan is a bit of a red herring because such a shift will not occur quickly.

    As of 2010, about 60 percent of all foreign-exchange reserves were denominated in dollars, giving the U.S. currency a critical mass. Investors are still comfortable with holding it; despite the country’s fiscal problems, in times of crisis, the dollar is regarded as a haven. It will take a long while for international investors to become confident that a Communist-led government will always respect their rights.

    China’s Enormous Economy

    By 2020, if current trends are realized, China will become the world’s largest economy. The nation’s foreign-exchange reserves already give it significant power as a creditor nation. But even if foreigners wanted to hold yuan instead of dollars, there would be constraints on their doing so. And removing the constraints would probably cause the yuan to soar, something that the Chinese are keen to avoid.
    So it seems unlikely that the next 10 years will see a yuan standard replacing a dollar standard. But might the present crisis conditions lead to some other sort of change? Might countries, for example, be driven to enter a new arrangement comparable to the 1944 Bretton Woods pact, in which the world’s major industrial states agreed to adhere to a global gold standard to stabilize international currencies?

    At this juncture, an agreement on this scale would be very difficult. Bretton Woods was made possible because of the limited number of participants and the urgency of wartime. Much of Europe was under Nazi occupation and could not take part; the Soviet Union had little intellectual input; and the developing world was consulted on a fairly cursory basis. The Americans were in charge, but listened to John Maynard Keynes out of respect for his intellect.
    A modern agreement would have to get consensus from the U.S., China, the European Union, India, Brazil, and so on. This would be tricky. But perhaps there could be an arrangement less formal than Bretton Woods. In November 2010, Robert Zoellick, a former U.S. Treasury official who runs the World Bank, wrote of a concept in which countries would agree on structural reforms to boost growth, forswear currency intervention and build a “co- operative monetary system.” This system, he continued, “should also consider employing gold as an international reference point of market expectations about inflation, deflation and future currency values.”

    Some saw this mild suggestion as a call for a return to the gold standard, which, barring desperate circumstances, is unlikely. But before we dismiss all ideas for reform, we should remember that the world operates under what some call a Bretton Woods II regime, with the Americans buying Chinese goods and the Chinese supplying the finance. The implications of this process are everlasting U.S. trade deficits and an ever-greater investment by the Chinese people in U.S. government debt.

    Dollar Connection

    The system may have suited the Chinese until now because they were eager to find manufacturing jobs for their rural population. At some point, however, the Chinese may feel the need to do something else with their trillions of dollars in reserves. Already they are looking to diversify by acquiring natural resources in the developing world. They have also criticized the U.S. for its economic policy, calling on the Americans to limit their budget deficit.

    Despite the strength of this rhetoric, the Chinese will not abandon the dollar outright. They already own so much in the way of U.S. government debt that any indication of their intention to sell would cause a plunge in bond prices. The fates of creditor and debtor are locked together. So the answer might be some kind of managed deal, with the Chinese agreeing to let their currency strengthen and to limit their current account surplus while the Americans agree to tackle their budget deficit. The currencies would trade in a range while the deficit would have a target.

    Timothy Geithner, the U.S. Treasury secretary, hinted at such a solution in October 2010, suggesting a limit on current account surpluses of about 4 percent of gross domestic product. A Group of 20 meeting of finance ministers nodded mildly in the direction of this proposal. But nothing will happen overnight. Neither the Chinese nor the Americans will want to accept constraints on their behavior.
    The Chinese will change tack if they believe such a shift is in their own interest. This might be because they face losses on their government-bond holdings, or because they wish to shift to a consumption-based, rather than an export-led, model to court domestic popularity.

    To some, the idea that the U.S. would accept constraints on the independence of its economic policy might seem a fantasy. It is hard enough for a president to get his own plans through Congress, let alone get approval for a set of policies dictated from abroad. As a result, one would expect a new system to arise only as part of a further crisis.

    Savers and Spenders

    In a speech in October 2010, Mervyn King, the governor of the Bank of England, called for a “grand bargain” among the major players in the world economy. “The risk,” he said, “is that, unless agreement on a common path of adjustment is reached, conflicting policies will result in an undesirably low level of world output, with all countries worse off as a result.”

    The fundamental problem is the imbalance between the saving and the spending nations. In a sense, the situation resembles that of the late 1920s when the Americans and French owned a huge proportion of the world’s gold reserves; this time it is the Asian and OPEC countries that have too much squirreled away. What should naturally happen in such circumstances is for the exchange rates of the surplus nations to appreciate. But countries have been attempting to hold their currencies down, either by intervening in the markets or by imposing capital controls. All currencies, however, cannot fall; some must rise and risk deflation in the process.

    Any target for exchange rates, or current-account surpluses, would have to be flexible. Fixed exchange rates require either subordination of monetary policy or capital controls to be effective. The Chinese, who already restrict investment, might favor capital controls, but it is hard to see the U.S., with its huge financial-services industry, agreeing to a worldwide restriction.

    However, there is one factor that might persuade the U.S. government to change its mind: its debt burden. As has already been discussed, reducing debt via an austerity program is unpalatable, and outright default is almost unthinkable. But governments did manage to reduce their debt burdens after World War II, under the auspices of the Bretton Woods system.

    Only with capital controls can government debt burdens be inflated away. Private savings can be more easily forced into public-sector debt.

    How would a managed exchange-rate system work today? Even under Bretton Woods, after all, it eventually proved impossible to keep exchange rates pegged. But the system did work for a quarter of a century. And if an exchange-rate peg gives speculators a tempting target, the answer would be to curb the speculators. Again, if the Chinese set the rules, such a move would seem more likely. They regard Western governments as foolish for allowing their economic policies to be at the mercy of the markets.

    If the U.K. set the terms of the gold standard, and the U.S. set those of Bretton Woods, then the terms of the next financial system are likely to be set by the world’s biggest creditor: China. And that system may look a lot different to the one we have become used to over the past 30 years.

    (Philip Coggan is a columnist for the Economist. This is an excerpt from his book, “Paper Promises: Debt, Money and the New World Order,” to be published Feb. 7 by Perseus Books. The opinions expressed are his own.)

    To contact the writer of this article: Philip Coggan at philipcoggan@economist.com
    To contact the editor responsible for this article: Mary Duenwald at mduenwald@bloomberg.net

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-0...ip-coggan.html

  3. #443
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    Quote Originally Posted by Screaming Eagle View Post
    The actual facts are that the Iran sanctions are taking effect and the Iran Central bank can neither buy or sell dollars. The rial has dropped more than 50% aganist the dollar and may soon be worthless. Since no one will accept the Iranian currency in trade, Russia and other countries as China and India have agreed to buy Iran's oil using their native currency. Russia buys Iran's oil using rubbles to buy oil and in turn Iran spends them back for trade goods from Russia. Iran is then forced to buy goods only from countries which do not accept the sanctions and buy their oil. Their world trade is restricted and they are facing economic collapse.

    http://news.yahoo.com/irans-ahmadine...112735157.html
    sounds to me like they got 'nothing to lose'.....and given the current scenario, that's scary.
    If I never clean another toilet....
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    Quote Originally Posted by diamondback View Post
    I once had a dream in which there was a Chinese junk sitting in a harbor. There were boats, rafts & people swimming towards it, all to get on board for trade with them. (I was swimming) The people on the ship were laughing at all the nations approaching them..they were commenting on how foolish we were for not being more frugal and not being able to see that we were the cause of their success (and our downfall).

    I believe that dream was a warning that the balance of power was shifting to China. I believe this video is true.
    "Nothing will happen with the dinar until the banks go electronic."

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    Lets not be angry at our new landlord "CHINA" I'm sure they will take better care us than our own Constitution has?

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    Seen a similar video before about 6 months. It's full of holes and contains hooey.

    On the super computer: China has the fastest. Not so.

    Japanese supercomputer is fastest in the world
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-31021_3-20...-in-the-world/

    And this might not be up to speed. The US may have one that can blow these two out of the water. We design the parts, they struggle to assemble them.

    Vacant houses in China: How about whole cities.

    The ghost towns of China:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-deserted.html

    They have more than what's showing up here.

    I could go on and on.

    China is a force, just not as big as portrayed in the video.

    It's like, buy more gold and silver, it's going to double, as it drops. Just another salesman.
    "A man only learns in two ways, one by reading, and the other by
    association with smarter people." --Will Rogers

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    Member of the Economic Committee: deterioration of the Syrian pound to the US dollar will deplete hard currency from Iraq
    Posted: March 21, 2012 in Iraqi Dinar/Politics
    Date: Wednesday, 21-03-2012 12: 33 pm

    Baghdad (newsletter) … Economic Committee member warned Deputy/Iraqi/coalition of draining albegari Noora hard currency from the country, as a result of the deterioration of the Syrian pound to the US dollar, will affect the rate of the Iraqi dinar international currencies.

    She albegari (News Agency news) on Wednesday: the low exchange rate of the Syrian pound to the US dollar will lead to withdrawal of hard currency from domestic markets for Syria as happened recently when Iranian the Toman degradation before the US dollar, and this will affect the value of the currency in the Iraqi market and low price of the dinar against the dollar.

    Called: the importance of taking the necessary actions to prevent smuggling hard currency out of the country through control of Iraqi borders with neighbouring States to reduce the emergence of cases thus, in addition to the Central Bank to take part in controlling the sale by his auction dollar that the operation will lead to increased demand for US dollar-buying.

    Added albegari: cannot make the deteriorating currency countries surrounding Iraq cast a negative impact on the Iraqi dinar, but we must work to increase the Iraqi currency exchange rate by selling Iraqi dinar crude oil also works now sell some oil Iran with local currency which saved the Toman’s deterioration to hard currency.

    The exchange rate of the Syrian pound has fallen significantly against the dollar, as a result of the political and security problems in all regions of Syria, which made the US dollar equals (7, 5) ls.

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    Turkey Realigning Exchange Rate, Ready to Defend Lira


    By Ercan Ersoy - Mar 29, 2012 4:07 AM MT

    Turkey’s central bank embarked on an “orderly realignment” of the exchange rate to help curb loan growth and its ready to defend the currency should that be needed, said Turalay Kenc, the bank’s deputy governor.

    Over-valuation of the lira, credit growth and the current account gap became major challenges for Turkey and other emerging market countries when capital inflows started in late 2010, Kenc said in a speech at a conference in Istanbul today.

    The central bank has the instruments and currency reserves to defend the lira against possible speculative attacks, Kenc said. Volatility in the lira is “low and we like it,” he said.

    The lira declined 0.1 percent to 1.7825 per dollar at 2:04 p.m. in Istanbul. The lira gained 6 percent this year after declining 18 percent in 2011, the biggest drop among currencies globally.

    To contact the reporter on this story: Ercan Ersoy in Istanbul at eersoy@bloomberg.net

    To contact the editor responsible for this story: Benedikt Kammel at bkammel@bloomberg.net

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-0...d-lira-1-.html

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    James Davidson says 82 Days on July 1, 2012


    http://hw.libsyn.com/p/8/5/e/85e5cde...f513f99b642363

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    Beginning of the countdown to the end of U.S. protection for Iraqi funds
    Posted: April 11, 2012 in Iraqi Dinar/Politics
    Tags: Barack Obama, Cabinet of Iraq, Central bank, Central Bank Iraq, Deputy prime minister,Iraq, iraqi, United States
    04/11/2012

    BAGHDAD / JD / .. only 39 days away from the end of U.S. protection for Iraqi funds deposited in international banks, which is that Iraq has failed to convince the Obama administration to extend the protection will be vulnerable to looting by the judge of compensation claims and described Eadah according to the CBI.

    Economic Committee of the Iraqi Council of Ministers resolution calling on the Prime Minister and the Foreign Ministry to address the U.S. President Obama about the possibility of extending the protection period for the money another year.

    And held a special ministerial committee to develop a mechanism to ensure the protection of Iraq’s money in its twentieth meeting on Wednesday morning under the chairmanship of Deputy Prime Minister Dr. Roژ Nuri Shaways and the presence of ministers of finance and oil, Justice and President of the Office of Financial Supervision and Governor of Central Bank of Iraq and Clai and Foreign Ministries of Planning and Legal Adviser to the Prime Minister and Advisor to the Deputy Prime Minister .

    The Committee deliberated the procedures and steps to be pursued to protect Iraqi funds and assets deposited abroad, especially with the imminent expiration of the protection provided by the U.S. presidential decision for the money and assets until next May.

    The Commission adopted a series of resolutions and recommendations to be working out in the forefront of a recommendation to the Council of Ministers to submit a formal request on behalf of the Government of the Republic of Iraq through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the U.S. government to adopt a resolution a new presidential provides protection for Iraqi funds for a new year with effect from 20 May 2012, according to the Bank CBI, decision to the United States President Barack Obama, put the Iraqi funds abroad, under American protection, and to prevent any judicial decisions to freezing or seizure under the presence of compensation claims and the resolutions of the debt raised by companies and people, and this protection will continue until the 20 of May next.

    He estimated the central bank the size of these funds as large, there are several billion dollars are distributed in a number of countries, in addition to money the Iraqi Development Fund, which contains revenue from the sale of oil that vary between 816 billion dollars, and there is also a $ 52 billion, money belonging to the Central Bank placed in banks U.S. cover of the Iraqi currency is not subject to the decisions of the freeze. Central Bank confirmed the words of his deputy, the appearance of Mohammed Saleh, said that Iraq is able to protect his money abroad and own all the ways the defense to stand against some of the exploiters of the situation in Iraq, and what happened after 1990 to file a lawsuit malicious compensation in large amounts, stressing that Iraq is not responsible for the policies committed the former regime, and the follow-up it confirms that most of these cases were unjustly.

    http://bit.ly/HCGim7

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    Quote Originally Posted by diamondback View Post
    James Davidson says 82 Days on July 1, 2012


    http://hw.libsyn.com/p/8/5/e/85e5cde...f513f99b642363


    diamondback excellent audio thanks for sharing, even if his timing is off it brings to light what is going on.

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    removed bbbbbbbbbb
    Last edited by Major Payne; 04-12-2012 at 07:50 PM.

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